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From the era before Sanger sequencing was invented.


Jun
14
comment Does the most common definition of “allele” include a change in phenotype?
I agree with the answer given by @Bez. The problem arises because the term "allele" was coined in an era when the only way to observe (or infer) the existence of different forms of a gene was through the associated change in phenotype (i.e. genes were not observable directly). Now that we can document single base changes via sequencing, the link to observable phenotype has been completely severed, but the idea of alleles as alternative forms of a single gene is still useful.
Jun
14
revised Does the most common definition of “allele” include a change in phenotype?
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Jun
13
comment What percentage of chimeric takes up in a cDNA library?
ok, just thought that it was worth checking for a trivial explanation first!
Jun
13
comment How specific is the adaptive immune response?
You are correct, specificity is in the antibody etc, but the killing/clearing mechanisms are the same in all cases.
Jun
13
comment level of organisation of proteins
Apologies Shigeta, I just didn't see it, possibly because I was still puzzled by the term 'intra-domain". I know what that means, but it doesn't map on to quaternary in my opinion.
Jun
12
comment level of organisation of proteins
Surely immunoglobulin molecules are excellent examples of the involvement of disulphides in the quaternary strucure of proteins?
Jun
12
comment What percentage of chimeric takes up in a cDNA library?
You say that you have looked at three frames. Which end of the cDNA are you sequencing from - are you sure that you are translating the correct strand?
Jun
11
comment How do penicillin resistant bacteria grow slower in the presence of penicillin?
Resistance to penicillin in B cereus is due to chromosomal genes, but not all B cereus strains are penicillin resistant. Do you know for certain that you used a resistant strain?
Jun
11
comment How does heat shock transformation work?
I think it is still true that no-one knows "exactly" what happens. There is a piece of received wisdom that by growing cells at 37C then shocking them at 42C, the membrane becomes more fluid (true) and this helps DNA to cross this barrier. If anyone writes an answer with evidence for this I for one will be very interested.
Jun
11
awarded  Custodian
Jun
11
revised alpha tubulin molecular weight problem
edited title
Jun
10
answered Can TGF beta family induce all somatic stem cells?
Jun
10
answered What are the naming conventions for mutations of proteins?
Jun
10
revised Silene virginica Endangered in FL
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Jun
10
answered Breaking a gene during recombination
Jun
10
answered How many recombination events are there per generation in humans?
Jun
6
revised On which part of the DNA will the new DNA nucleotide connect?
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Jun
6
comment Why does the oxygen produced in the photosynthesis come from water and not CO$_2$?
@The Last Word - great link.
Jun
6
revised Why does the oxygen produced in the photosynthesis come from water and not CO$_2$?
edited body
Jun
6
revised Anaerobic respiration choice in E. coli
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