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From the era before Sanger sequencing was invented.


Aug
5
comment What would be the scientific name of this worm
So, in summary, it is Nereis effigiei
Aug
5
comment Possible reasons for DNA getting stuck in well
I think this is a case where Occam's razor can be applied. The problem appeared with a new DNA sample, so that sample must be the prime suspect.
Aug
5
comment Possible reasons for DNA getting stuck in well
Given that the OP knows the behaviour of markers in this gel it seems unlikely that this is the problem. Also although 1% agarose may not be suitable for achieving good resolution in the 10 kb range, this is very different from a fragment not entering the gel. I would try cleaning up the template further.
Aug
5
answered Why does the pET- expression vector contain a LacI gene additionally to the one in the genome?
Aug
2
comment Why don't animals produce alcohol
But the question wasn't about a hypothetical alternative metabolic system, it was about the existing one using lactate and not ethanol as an end product of fermentation. So yes, if our metabolic sytem was constructed differently it would be ... different.
Aug
2
revised What is the specific use of a capsule in E.coli?
edited body; edited title
Aug
2
revised Regarding cancer cells and radio-frequency ablation
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Aug
1
answered What makes certain obligate anaerobes viable in fermentation starter cultures?
Aug
1
revised Why don't animals produce alcohol
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Aug
1
revised Why don't animals produce alcohol
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Aug
1
answered Why don't animals produce alcohol
Aug
1
comment What makes certain obligate anaerobes viable in fermentation starter cultures?
mic.sgmjournals.org/content/127/1/121.full.pdf - link to a paper in which P. shermanii is grown in flask culture. Although the conditions are clearly designed to achieve low oxygen concentrations in the culture, they also indicate that oxygen is not toxic for this organism. This is from the WP page you linked to: "Obligate anaerobes are microorganisms that are killed by normal atmospheric concentrations of oxygen (21% O2). Oxygen tolerance varies between species, some capable of surviving in up to 8% oxygen, others losing viability unless the oxygen concentration is less than 0.5%."
Jul
31
comment What makes certain obligate anaerobes viable in fermentation starter cultures?
Do you have a reference for the fact that they are obligate anaerobes?
Jul
30
revised No digested product bands, but markers are visible. What could be the reasons?
edited title
Jul
29
comment Why is too much glucose harmful?
An excellent answer - it really should be accepted.
Jul
29
comment “Same” DNA vs genes
Repeat of biology.stackexchange.com/questions/9172/…
Jul
27
comment Why is too much glucose harmful?
Perhaps worth adding that the level of glycated haemoglobin is used as a way of monitoring how well diabetes is being controlled over the long term.
Jul
27
comment Why is too much glucose harmful?
This answer has things backwards. In diabetes the failure of the insulin response to high blood sugar means that the glucose carriers are not recruited to the cell membranes. This results in a decreased capacity for glucose uptake and so blood sugar stays high. Also, glucose does not "oxidise itself".
Jul
27
revised Why is too much glucose harmful?
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Jul
27
revised Why is too much glucose harmful?
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