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comment What is LD50 for 25i (25I-NBOMe)?
Wiki is not quiet. It explicitly says the LD-50 has not been determined.
Jul
22
comment Can foxes move their ears independently?
Not easy for me. Your reference (1) does not support your point directly and reference (2) is to a book with no page number. Can you please find a reference that directly supports the point?
Jul
22
comment Can foxes move their ears independently?
How can you tell from a still photo that only one ear is moving?
Jul
20
comment More entropy: Atom or Macromolecule?
@WYSIWYG: While I think "better suited in ___" is not a basis for closing the question is just not very good so I think it should be closed anyway. Thanks.
Jul
20
comment More entropy: Atom or Macromolecule?
Number of microstates, yes. Being struck (or not) by photons, no. Incoming photons may affect the entropy of a system but the entropy is defined in terms of possible microstates (restrictions on freedom of rotation, etc.). I think the language is confusing.
Jul
20
comment More entropy: Atom or Macromolecule?
Link to Meta question: (meta.biology.stackexchange.com/questions/640/…)
Jul
19
comment More entropy: Atom or Macromolecule?
The OP should have indicated the question was cross-posted. Otherwise it is allowed. The answer at the other SE points out a weakness of the question but cross-pollination is good. It looks like I will be making my case on Meta again.
Jul
19
comment More entropy: Atom or Macromolecule?
Being struck by photons and emitting light have nothing to do with entropy in this setting.
Jul
19
comment More entropy: Atom or Macromolecule?
I see the close vote is for off-topic. I think this question is safely in the intersection of chemistry/physics and biology. Entropy is very important in biology and I think this standard question is not off-topic.
Jul
18
comment Where are the evolutionary “inbetweeners”?
Your shark head diagram sort of says it all.
Jul
18
comment Why are there species instead of a continuum of various animals?
Genetic circuit design is a similar idea. The power of the nested loop gives a lot of insight into long processes. + 1
Jul
18
comment Where are the evolutionary “inbetweeners”?
What about developing a standard answer for questions like this which are too broad? You have almost done this and I think this is the right approach. Otherwise someone tries to answer and others try to close. Better yet, a standard comment with a list of basic texts?
Jul
18
comment Where are the evolutionary “inbetweeners”?
Remi.b asked my next question for me. If there were only two grades of hammerhead would you insist on the two intermediates? And if there were four would you insist on eight, one between each gradation?
Jul
18
comment Where are the evolutionary “inbetweeners”?
This is a great question (in the first para.). I don't usually upvote comments but +1.
Jul
18
comment Where are the evolutionary “inbetweeners”?
Have you studied the variety of hammerhead sharks? Do they all have precisely the same proportions? Even checking the Wiki entry, it indicates the winghead shark has the most pronounced cephalofoil. That would mean others are much less so. So there are gradations. It may not be a perfect spectrum but it may be that intermediates were poorly adapted.
Jul
18
comment Where are the evolutionary “inbetweeners”?
The fossil record in general contains transitional forms for some animals and not for others. Since geology and other factors enter into this, I think one has to choose a specific animal and ask why the fossil record might be deficient. Where would we find a transitional hammerhead shark, for example?
Jul
18
comment Why doesn't honey spoil quickly?
Based on Alan Boyd's link I think this is a dupe.
Jul
15
comment Do ants feel acceleration?
If you snorkel with weights on you find that the buoyant force of water nearly matches the pulls of gravity. It's easy to become disoriented even though we are quite sensitive to the acceleration of gravity. Ants may have a similar issue because their mass is very small and the acceleration of gravity is unlikely to cause them injury. But an insect which carries large loads and walks probably has an acute sense of gravitational acceleration, even if it's tuned in a different way.
Jul
13
comment Currency metabolites vs. current metabolites: What's the right term?
I wonder if 'current metabolite' is not simply a mistake? The second usage does not sound idiomatic.
Jul
12
comment Is there any size limit to the amount of information a human (or other) brain can hold
Yes. The brain has finite size. You can't keep an infinite amount of information in a finite space.