185 reputation
7
bio website
location
age
visits member for 1 years, 6 months
seen Mar 20 at 23:33

Sep
21
awarded  Commentator
Sep
21
comment Are there any gluten-eating bacteria that are readily available?
What is the goal? Removing gluten from wheat flour?
Sep
21
answered How Do Acid and Base Loving Plants Get Enough PO4?
Sep
21
comment How Do Acid and Base Loving Plants Get Enough PO4?
@biogirl it would be because the phosphorous is more likely to dissolve in water at this pH than to react with iron, aluminum or calcium. This makes it available to the plant since it cannot absorb insoluble compounds.
Feb
7
awarded  Teacher
Oct
28
comment Why does the butterfly have a cocoon stage in its life cycle?
In addition to the list provided by @BruceAlderman, beetles also undergo complete metamorphosis.
Oct
24
awarded  Quorum
Oct
18
accepted Mutation in axillary buds of trees overcoming self-incompatability?
Oct
18
comment Mutation in axillary buds of trees overcoming self-incompatability?
Going through my old Botany textbooks. It would appear that for at least one mechanism for self-incompatability, it would require between one and three de novo mutations. Perhaps for some mechanisms it would be more likely, and perhaps someone has come across this in the wild, but for now this works for me. :)
Oct
14
awarded  Scholar
Oct
14
accepted Does cooking or ripening reduce the concentration of solanine in nightshade?
Oct
14
comment Does cooking or ripening reduce the concentration of solanine in nightshade?
The database link is good. My background is in taxonomy and phylogenetics, so I am at a loss for knowing where to look up things that are not gene/protein sequences or species identification. It is unfortunate that the evidence in the answer for reduced levels in nightshade after ripening is all implicit. I would have thought there would be some information about levels, or lack thereof in the ripe berries.
Oct
11
comment “Acellular” designation for organisms
Our own cells are not separated by cell walls either. This is an error in Wikipedia. It should probably read "cell membranes".
Oct
11
comment Why do plants have green leaves and not red?
Heat is the least of a plant's problems. That is why we can breed black tulips without self-cooking petals. ;)
Oct
11
revised Why do plants have green leaves and not red?
Added an example
Oct
11
revised Does cooking or ripening reduce the concentration of solanine in nightshade?
Species is not shown to be in my area, and S. dulcamara looks like a better candidate
Oct
11
comment Does cooking or ripening reduce the concentration of solanine in nightshade?
Actually, it doesn't show either of those in my area. I don't have one to key out, but the illustration for S. dulcamara looks like the correct one.
Oct
11
comment Does cooking or ripening reduce the concentration of solanine in nightshade?
The common name is green nightshade. I am guessing viridi, but I will check in Flora of the Pacific Northwest.
Oct
11
comment Do plants produce any heat?
These and other plants make use of the cyanide-resistant pathway. This is a short-cut in the electron transport chain that allows the plant to produce extra heat at the expense of not using those electrons to manufacture ATP. (It is called the cyanide-resistant pathway because it provides an alternate pathway for the electrons to take. Rather than killing the cell quickly via free-radical production, it is slowly starved via lack of ATP.)
Oct
11
answered Why do plants have green leaves and not red?