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Apr
9
comment Is the bulbourethral (Cowper) gland turned on during puberty or is it on at birth?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about the physiology of the healthy human body, and should be migrated to Biology
Nov
24
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
17
comment Homeopathy is placebo, but isn't placebo good?
> you think, say, that your lung function is improving, but it's actually not - If you think this is the placebo effect, you have misunderstood it.
Nov
17
answered Are missing limbs hereditary?
Nov
15
comment Does a DNA sequence has its own derivation tree or pattern?
@kate I still don't understand your question. What are DNA sequences supposed to be derived from?
Nov
15
comment Does a DNA sequence has its own derivation tree or pattern?
DNA does not have its own language, it's a simple storage medium. It encodes information, but not in any way similar to a human language. Maybe this encoding fulfils the definition of a formal language, but if you have never gone into that branch of maths, any comparison will be more confusing than enlightening.
Nov
15
comment Does a DNA sequence has its own derivation tree or pattern?
Hello kate, I don't understand your question. The "derivation tree" you are describing is a structure which is specific to linguistics. How could a DNA have such a thing? It does not represent human language.
Nov
12
comment “synapses grow closer together in order to decrease the distance”, is it true?
The first red flag is that this sentence is incorrect, based on the explanation following it in the source you linked. It suggests that there would be a reduced distance from one synapse to the next, while the text really explains that there will be a reduction in the width of the synaptic cleft. I am not certain enough to give an answer, but the sloppy language alone makes me think the author does not know what he's talking about.
Nov
12
comment Front versus back in animal anatomy
@vervet I think the first paragraph ("musculature of the front closes or curls up the belly") makes it clear the question is about a ventral/dorsal distinction. I am not so sure about the clarity of the actual questions. What is a real pattern at an embryological level, what is a pattern of adaptation, and how do they differ? What is a "biological system", and how does one recognize a front to back separation in a "system" which is something else than one organism's body? The second and fourth points seem clear.
Nov
7
awarded  Talkative
Oct
30
comment Why do snakes not have eyelids?
"the fact that they are not as evolved as we humans" - there is no such fact. Evolution is not a scale going from "less" to "more". All organisms are equally evolved. So, it can't be due to that "fact" by definition.
Oct
25
awarded  Yearling
Oct
20
comment Why don't bacteria eat food leftovers?
@AliceD both are possible, I suspect it's the circumstances which determine which ones will get the upper hand - I think it's mostly up to temperature, with bacteria being more likely at room temperature and fungi preferring it below 20 C. I can say from "standard food safety knowledge" (sorry that I can't point to a specific reference right now) that B. cereus is very fond of cooked starches, and can confirm from personal slob experience that you certainly can incubate a nice bacterial colony on pasta or rice - I didn't do anything to confirm that it's B. cereus, though.
Oct
20
comment Why don't bacteria eat food leftovers?
Heh, no problem - if I didn't have the patience, I wouldn't have written an answer. Also, you're raising an interesting philosophical question - can bacteria "like" something?
Oct
20
answered Why don't bacteria eat food leftovers?
Oct
20
comment Why don't bacteria eat food leftovers?
The assumption is indeed wrong. But even if it were right, the spoon would be covered in gunk consisting of dead bacteria bodies + their waste product.
Oct
20
comment Why don't bacteria eat food leftovers?
why would you assume that a bacterial colony looks "clean"?
Oct
20
comment Why do we laugh?
@GoodGravy First, how do you know that this hypothesis is unscientific, when you don't know either how it was derived, nor what scientific evidence there is for it, and how much it incorporates the findings you referenced in your own answer? You are making assumptions without having the information necessary to judge. Second, "this answer doesn't reflect any uncertainty" - why? The first thing it says is "It is not known for sure". And the second says that the rest of an answer is a theory I have found convincing after having read the argumentation its authors have for it.
Oct
20
comment Why do we laugh?
@GoodGravy 100% of science is simply hypotheses which best fit what we have observed so far. Nothing in science is proven as the absolute truth, that's the point of it. This is why have the theory of evolution, not the gospel of evolution. Also, looking at a branch of science which does its empiric research differently than yours and declaring it "not empirical" is short sighted. To sum it up: I am not afraid to say that we don't know much about laughter and humor. Neither is the author of the book I cite. But I am convinced that we have a good, stable theory here, not idle musings.
Oct
20
comment Why do we laugh?
Oh, and another thing: there are no arguments in my answer, except the one connection from humor to laughter. I needed this space to simply explain the claim of the theory. I did not attempt to reproduce any of the evidence for it - if somebody can do this in a reasonable length of text, I am not this person. The book I am speaking of uses 3 pages to explain the above, and another 370 to present arguments for it. So of course you won't feel convinced of the theory being true just by reading this answer - don't expect this, or take it as evidence that the theory is not true.