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Oct
2
comment Are there any substance that are more dangerous at low dose than at higher dose?
+1 although I don’t think this is what OP was referring to because the effect is indirect rather than there being a toxic effect of the antibiotic of the host which decreases with increased dose.
Oct
1
comment Are there any substance that are more dangerous at low dose than at higher dose?
@Lo Unclear? It means that things get more toxic with increased dose, never the other way round.
Sep
30
comment Are there any substance that are more dangerous at low dose than at higher dose?
@David No, sorry. “no matter the dose” is also stretching it a bit – you always need some minimal amount, it’s just that the steepness of the curve varies.
Sep
30
answered Are there any substance that are more dangerous at low dose than at higher dose?
Sep
30
comment Is there life on other planets and if so how frequent?
It’s interesting to note that at least among leading astronomers there seems to be no question about this at all: the existence of extraterrestrial life is simply assumed. The only question is about when we find it, not whether (see e.g. some New Scientist issue from earlier this year).
Sep
30
comment Do Viruses produce a biomagnetic field?
Given that viruses are using the same building blocks as the rest of the known organisms (RNA/DNA), claiming that they do not belong to the tree of life sounds odd. Of course they do (as in, they share a common ancestor). Is this really a notable position?
Sep
30
comment Why are antibiotics prescribed with a viral infection like a cold?
@MCM Better cite sources for that since I know doctors who do prescribe antibiotics for the reason outlined in Bitwise’s answer. Can’t say I’m a fan of this wasteful use of antibiotics but there you go.
Sep
30
revised Have there been attempts to identify Chomsky's “language mutation” in humans?
Corrected spelling of Päabo’s name
Sep
30
awarded  Custodian
Sep
30
reviewed Reject How are different types of cells created from zygote?
Sep
18
comment How are antibodies designed?
@Alan I was actually talking about the monoclonal antibody design described in your previous link. The description there is quite good (mind writing up an answer?) although I’d wish for more detail in steps 1 & 2 … (there’s also a nice Wikipedia article but it’s less concise and not as well suited for an answer here, I think).
Sep
18
comment How and where, in the human brain, are memories stored?
@Preece But much of the work with neural networks isn’t really done in a context of AI research, it’s simply a tool in statistics, and here people are only interested in statistical properties, and it’s easy to show that a single hidden layer ANN is just as mathematically expressive as any more complex version so more complex versions are not just impractical, they are unnecessary. And on the AI / comp. neuroscience side of things there is a lot of research done in this area.
Sep
18
comment How and where, in the human brain, are memories stored?
@Preece I agree with all of your comment except the last sentence. Biology isn’t being neglected, it’s simply not relevant: neural networks in CS solve a problem, and that problem isn’t “try to model biology as accurately as possible”, nor is it trying to create a “classical” AI. It’s simply a statistical tool for pattern matching / clustering. That said, modelling the biology accurately would be interesting in its own right; it isn’t done for one simple reason: it’s not computationally feasible.
Sep
17
comment Does DNA contain information beyond protein synthesis?
@AlanBoyd No. Both I and Ewan would disagree. Ewan makes a clear distinction between the definition of “functional” which his detractors use, which would be under positive selection (and which would yield the 8% estimate, still way above classical estimates), and the one he uses, which yield 80% actively implicated in the binding of <whatever> factors (but which doesn’t necessarily contribute to the cell’s fitness, and which therefore maybe isn’t under selective pressure).
Sep
17
comment Does DNA contain information beyond protein synthesis?
@Alan It absolutely is. The interaction is shown in vivo. The debate over whether this binding performs a function (and the definition thereof). Whether functional or not, it is, at some point or other, bound to – either by transcription factors or transcription machinery (i.e. transcribed). Ewan says exactly that in the blog post you linked, and he even qualifies his use of the word “functional”.
Sep
16
comment Does DNA contain information beyond protein synthesis?
@S.RobertJames I don’t know. I would guess that most (though obviously not all, e.g. mitochondria / chloroplasts) organelles could also form de novo since their constituents are once again coded for in the nuclear genome and their assembly might again be either spontaneous or aided by other proteins. In fact, a friend just reminded me of things like centrioles which require a helper protein for assembly.
Sep
16
revised How are antibodies designed?
edited title
Sep
16
comment How are antibodies designed?
@Alan I didn’t. Nico added that word. I was actually interested in in vivo route. I think nico also meant the same (I wasn’t even aware that there was another route) and simply wanted to stress that they are designed.
Sep
16
answered Does DNA contain information beyond protein synthesis?
Sep
16
asked How are antibodies designed?