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HS Biology teacher and avid home remodeler in Louisville, KY.


Apr
9
comment Appropriate statistical test for a student lab?
You may have a point on the off topic bit, though I've already started, so.... :) To clarify the lab a bit: Students press candies together over three rounds of "natural selection" (starting with 12 candies of each type- m&ms, skittles, etc- 4 types total). Survivors go on to the next round and replicate when the population gets below a certain number. We do another round where kids pour the candy on desks pushed together and some bounce in to the neighbors areas to represent migration, and another simulation for a bottleneck. Students then look at how much each factor affected the #s.
Apr
8
asked Appropriate statistical test for a student lab?
Dec
4
comment Why do yeast ferment Equal sweetener
I agree with all of this, except there is one problem with the data. (Keep in mind this was High School Bio) A packet of equal is far less mass than a packet of sucrose(since aspartame has such a high sweetness profile), and as such a packet contains a very small amount of dextrose compared to the amount of glucose/fructose in the sucrose packets. That said, there was nearly as much CO2 generated by two packets of Equal as four packets of sucrose. Granted, there is an upper limit to the yeast growth curve and metabolism, but there were higher rates as we increased from 2 to 4 packets sucrose.
Dec
4
awarded  Yearling
Dec
3
asked Why do yeast ferment Equal sweetener
Nov
18
asked How much does the Hayflick limit/telomere length vary across taxa and within humans?
Nov
8
accepted Common Ancestry of ETCs and ATP Synthase complexes
Nov
4
asked Common Ancestry of ETCs and ATP Synthase complexes
May
23
comment Why is a slow worm not considered a snake?
I'd agree that the visual system of cephalopods and vertebrates likely evolved in one common ancestor. However, this was a rudimentary "eye". The modern lens-type eyes of both groups almost certainly evolved independently from this common ancestral organ.
May
23
answered Has medical progress stopped human evolution?
May
8
comment Are any organisms known to use meiosis I to create non-identical offspring asexually?
Good to know! However, I was under the impression that Cnemidophorus lizards gave rise to clones. If I understand you (and the article) then this gives rise to varied offspring. Obviously there is no infusion of new genetic information from other individuals, but it would still seem farm more advantageous (especially in vertebrates) to produce offspring in this way, than by a mitotic mechanism. I find it odd that there don't seem to versions of automixy (that I can discern) that simply forgo meiosis II. Wouldn't this be the simplest way to generate variation and maintain chromosome number?
May
8
awarded  Scholar
May
8
accepted Are any organisms known to use meiosis I to create non-identical offspring asexually?
May
6
asked Are any organisms known to use meiosis I to create non-identical offspring asexually?
May
6
comment can the face of a person be accurately predicted from DNA information?
I posed a similar question a while back. You might want to check it out, even if the answer is inconclusive...
May
6
awarded  Supporter
Apr
22
awarded  Editor
Apr
22
revised How to know if a woman is fertile without actually making her pregnant?
added 1011 characters in body
Apr
22
answered How to know if a woman is fertile without actually making her pregnant?
Mar
19
comment Are there any studies of epigenetic difference between twins during their lifespan?
I have seen "Ghost in Your Genes". Excellent doc, which, in part, got me thinking about this (yes the Spanish twins in particular). I was meaning more systematically through life (testing at regular intervals). In the documentary, the observations seemed a bit less pre-defined. On a related note, could anyone point me to the specific methodologies for assessing whole-genome epigenetic differences?