Keegan Keplinger

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bio website keegan.aws.af.cm
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visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen May 24 at 13:20

BS Physics

MS Computational Neuroscience

PhD Theoretical Neuroscience (pursuing)


Apr
25
answered Hebbian theory “fire together” clarification
Jan
5
comment Disproportion in cranial nerve innervation?
I wonder to what extent 1) contributes to social communication (specifically, through a wider array of facial expressions).
Jan
5
comment What are current abiogenesis hypotheses for first food source?
In RNA world hypothesis, ribozyme is thought to play the role of reproducing molecule. That may help you with more initial research, but I don't know the answer to your specific question.
Jan
5
revised Do local field potentials (LFP) create waves on the surfaces of nerve cells?
deleted 37 characters in body
Jan
4
comment Saltatory Conduction Of Nerve Impulses
Also, in addition to what Shefali said, another reason its energy efficient is because there's less passive leak of charge across the myelin.
Jan
4
comment Saltatory Conduction Of Nerve Impulses
Increase in temperature is an increase in kinetic energy, which speeds up the process of diffusion (more kinetic energy means more collisions per unit time).
Jan
4
answered Do local field potentials (LFP) create waves on the surfaces of nerve cells?
Jan
1
answered Why has evolution made neurons use spiking?
Dec
31
awarded  Yearling
Oct
5
comment What happens in the synapse when cocaine administration occurs in the human brain
I'm not a medical expert, but I don't know of any damage to brain from cocaine. Of course, using cocaine, flooding your dopamine receptors, your body will compensate in the long run by reducing the number of receptors on the post-synaptic neuron (and it will require more cocaine next time). Once you quit doing cocaine, it will take a while to recover normal receptor levels.
Oct
4
comment What happens in the synapse when cocaine administration occurs in the human brain
ligan-receptor kinetics have an "off-rate" and an "on-rate" so yes, they can bind more than once, but some receptors can become "desensitized" from being stimulated. Regardless, having more neurotransmitter in the vicinity of receptors leads to a larger chance per unit time of ligand finding receptor and activating it.
Sep
29
answered What happens in the synapse when cocaine administration occurs in the human brain
Aug
23
answered What would happen if you slowly crushed a live brain?
Aug
13
answered Neuromediator, Neuromodulator, Neurotransmitter?
Aug
10
awarded  Commentator
Aug
10
comment What decides the position of the node of Ranvier?
Ah, ok, this is the same paper, but I have changed the quote to the more specific discussion of myelination; short story: the axons themselves cue the oligodendrocytes.
Aug
10
revised What decides the position of the node of Ranvier?
updated to more specific request of questioner from same paper
Aug
9
comment What areas of the brain are involved in doing arithmetic operations?
neurosynth is a useful tool for answering these kinds of questions. Go there and enter "arithmetic" in the search bar and you can find a number of studies through meta-analysis and their relevant brain regions on a brain map. Note it's in beta, so use the "studies" tab to confirm with the literature.
Aug
9
answered What decides the position of the node of Ranvier?
Aug
8
comment If people with colorblindness lack one type of cone cells, shouldn't they be unable to recognize one particular color?
The decoding scheme is direct measurement of cone activity in the presence of light. But how the higher processing centers interpret signals from the cones is not as straightforward as you might imagine; it's actually still an open question! Opponent process is a current theory about how it works, but the experiments consist of more psychology than neuroscience so we're on the outside looking in. But notice that the evidence suggests that R-G relies on only two cones, while Y-B relies on all three. So there's probably some loss in YB, but not to the point where you can't differentiate them.