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Jun
20
reviewed Reviewed Why is cisplatin a very potent antineoplastic for testicular cancer, but not necessarily for other cancers?
Jun
16
awarded  Constituent
Jun
16
reviewed No Action Needed Introductory book in genetics?
Jun
12
reviewed Reviewed Expected reproduction rate of a dandelion and/or fern
Jun
12
reviewed Looks OK What does the human body use oxygen for besides the final electron acceptor in the electron transport chain?
Jun
12
comment Can photosyntetic cells be genetically modified to grow at a faster rate?
You might be interested in reading about artificial photosynthesis.
Jun
12
reviewed No Action Needed Choosing a book to gain general knowledge about biology
Jun
11
reviewed Approve Following DNA replication during S-phase of the cell-cycle, are all genomic regions subjected to the same stringent level of DNA-Repair?
Jun
10
reviewed Approve Cleavage of RNA by restriction enzymes?
Jun
9
reviewed Reviewed Can systemic intravascular thrombosis cause brain infarction?
Jun
8
reviewed Looks OK Can carnivores survive on a (processed) vegetarian diet? Why or why not?
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
Jun
8
comment Brain regeneration - book recommendation
You've included figures from PNAS, which could get Biology SE in trouble over copyright issues, especially since I do not believe the article in question is Open Access.
Jun
8
comment How do carrier RNAs increase yield in sequencing experiments?
Thank you for the information, but this does not answer my question. Are carrier RNAs used at other steps in preparation for sequencing?
Jun
8
asked How do carrier RNAs increase yield in sequencing experiments?
Jun
8
reviewed Approve Why do surface mole tunnels follow directly below the electric fenceline
Jun
7
comment X-recessive disorders and genetic markers
m = disease-causing allele, M = wild type allele.
Jun
7
comment X-recessive disorders and genetic markers
(cont'd) because the two loci are so close by -- it could just be a different allele in different families. Does that make sense?
Jun
7
comment X-recessive disorders and genetic markers
(cont'd) and you will see that the disease goes along with the A1 allele in successive generations. However, it could have just as easily been the M locus becoming mutated on a chromosome that has the A2 allele - and in some other families, this might be true for the same disease. In that case, the disease will be associated with the A2 allele for that family, for the very same disease. The marker allele is only informative within the context of a single pedigree - you don't know which allele is associated for unrelated families. What you do know is that the marker is linked to the disease +
Jun
7
comment X-recessive disorders and genetic markers
Almost, but not quite. There is a marker A1 that has sequence AGTAGTAGTAGT where individuals with A2 with have sequence AGTAGTAAAAGT at the same A locus. Some very short distance away from the A locus, there is a disease locus - when individuals have only the m allele instead of the M allele, they have the disease. Because the A locus and the M locus are so close together (i.e. linked), meiotic recombination is very unlikely. So if the M locus becomes mutated on one chromosome that happens to have the A1 allele, the disease m allele becomes linked to the A1 allele +