3,441 reputation
749
bio website gravatar.com/lancelafontaine
location Montreal, Canada
age 22
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Jul 21 at 23:08

Hey there, my name is Lance Lafontaine.

I am a student at Concordia University in software engineering, with a previous degree in molecular biology. I love all things tech, science and startups.

  • Follow LanceLafontaine on Twitter.
  • Email me at lance.lafontaine92@gmail.com.

May
12
comment Number of beneficial mutations cataloged?
A "beneficial mutation" is often hard to point out: it would likely be very slight and context-dependent. For example, a "superhero" gene is obviously out of the question, and a very small phenotypic difference would probably either be insignificant or beneficial in one particular environment but not in another.
May
12
answered Molecularly, why can you straighten or perm hair?
May
11
accepted What happens to dextrorotatory amino acids in humans?
May
9
revised Molecularly, why can you straighten or perm hair?
added 1 characters in body
May
9
asked Molecularly, why can you straighten or perm hair?
May
8
revised What exactly is meant by the expression “differentially expressed”?
Fixed typo, and formatted.
May
8
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
8
suggested suggested edit on What exactly is meant by the expression “differentially expressed”?
May
8
awarded  Civic Duty
May
7
comment The genetic and physiological origins of laughter?
@Preece, notice that I mention exactly that in the question. I'm not looking for the impossible, but rather what's already known, if anything. And if nothing is known, an answer explaining why would be sufficient.
May
7
comment The genetic and physiological origins of laughter?
Rather than the behavioural act of laughing itself, I'm more concerned with the biological ability to laugh that humans and some great apes have, according to the report. As laughter also has some sort of genetic component, there must be some genes being expressed within specifically primates that allows us to laugh. I'm thus interested in the expression of these genes, and how they interact to create the phenotype of being able to laugh.
May
6
comment The genetic and physiological origins of laughter?
Hmm. Signalling pathways, anatomy as well, but I'm mostly interested in the molecular genetics of it. Your answer is certainly a fine one, but doesn't quite cover that area.
May
6
revised The genetic and physiological origins of laughter?
Formatted links, added specificity.
May
6
comment The genetic and physiological origins of laughter?
Informative and relevant response, but I'm also looking for some sort of a more "molecular" explanation as well. Any more insight?
May
6
revised toxicology wiki excerpt
added 128 characters in body
May
6
revised spliceosome wiki excerpt
added 105 characters in body
May
6
revised thermodynamics wiki excerpt
added 102 characters in body
May
6
revised restriction-enzymes wiki excerpt
added 96 characters in body
May
6
revised polyploidy wiki excerpt
added 85 characters in body
May
6
revised neurology wiki excerpt
added 237 characters in body