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visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen Jan 3 at 11:05

Derfder is my name ;)


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
May
18
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
20
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
19
awarded  Yearling
Jan
4
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
16
asked The least complex animals with ability to dream
Dec
11
accepted What is the most genetically simple organism except viruses?
Dec
10
comment What is the most genetically simple organism except viruses?
@biogirl So, the smallest organism (except viruses and mits) has 159,662 TACG pairs? No smallest number found so far? Any knowledge about this thing?
Dec
10
asked What is the most genetically simple organism except viruses?
Sep
12
comment Which part of the brain needs to be shut down to lose conciousness?
I agree with biochick, it's reticular formation The reticular formation has projections to the thalamus and cerebral cortex that allow it to exert some control over which sensory signals reach the cerebrum and come to our conscious attention. It plays a central role in states of consciousness like alertness and sleep. Injury to the reticular formation can result in irreversible coma. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reticular_formation#Functions BUt again I guess there are a lot of other control mechanisms in the brain on the cellular and bigger levels.
Sep
1
revised Is the missing “life-ingredient” in today's Earth's existence the reason why we cannot recreate life?
edited title
Sep
1
asked Is the missing “life-ingredient” in today's Earth's existence the reason why we cannot recreate life?
Aug
20
asked Why doesn't human consumption of plants cause infectious diseases the way consumption of animals can?
Aug
9
comment Why does the stomach ache if you take a brisk walk after lunch or dinner
Maybe the acid can go to places through the sphincters (because you move) where the epithel is not accustomed to that kind of acids and then it hurts. And also there is more blood while you are digesting in the stomach and the inervation is more sensitive at that time. But I don't have any proof at my hands right now, so only a comment ;)
Jun
27
comment Why must a planet be in a star's “habitable zone” to have life?
@Daniel here is a summary of what the water is capable of and why it is so important for life (as we know it) and why astrophysicists are looking mostly for planets with water as a possible life candidate youtube.com/watch?v=7sA_JJ9gj2E Btw. the thing with God is exagerating, but everything else is a nice summary of some articles. So, if you want to watch a 10 min talk about how the water is good for life, watch that video.
Jun
27
comment Why must a planet be in a star's “habitable zone” to have life?
@Daniel It is necessary for the life as we know it on our planet. If you want to speculate then many other things are possible. But the scientists take in count the fact how the elements are spread through the Cosmos. And they came to the conclusion that hydrogen and oxygen are pretty common. E.g. you have ice on Mercury, Earth, Mars and on Jupiter's and Saturn's moons, asteroids, comets and probably many other objects ad planets in space. More about the importance of water is e.g. in the 1st or 2nd episode od Wonder of Life, when Brain talks about the "cell = batteries" and "waterfalls";)
Jun
26
revised Why must a planet be in a star's “habitable zone” to have life?
added 5 characters in body
Jun
26
revised Why must a planet be in a star's “habitable zone” to have life?
edited body
Jun
26
revised Why must a planet be in a star's “habitable zone” to have life?
edited body
Jun
26
answered Why must a planet be in a star's “habitable zone” to have life?