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seen Oct 18 at 16:51

Oct
18
awarded  Custodian
Oct
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How to visualize the ECM?
Oct
17
comment How to visualize the ECM?
Yes, sorry---ECM = extracellular matrix, HA = hyaluronic acid. I know that a typical hematoxylin and eosin stain (H & E) will pick up things that are negatively charged, such as HA, but how can you fix cells without disrupting the ECM? Also, I was wondering if methods exist to analyze cell ECM production via fluorescence or some other method that utilizes a probe that I could observe with a microscope.
Oct
17
asked How to visualize the ECM?
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Apr
19
asked Copper for cell incubator to prevent contamination
Apr
10
asked PTMs of proteins via mass spec?
Apr
2
comment EGFR, sialylation, and cancer progression
I know many people have long been trying to create glyco-transferase inhibitors to try to inhibit things like sialyation of cancer cell surfaces to prevent metastasis. This paper alludes to the idea that this might be bad because it would promote EGFR activation. I can't see why the authors would reach such a conclusion based solely off the study of just 1 glycoprotein when there are many others on the surface that may have negative influences if excess sialylated.
Apr
2
comment EGFR, sialylation, and cancer progression
Thanks for the response Matt. I guess I just don't see how it is possible to target siaylation of a specific glycoprotein in a cancer cell. Not only would that likely require cancer cell specificity, it would require activation of some metabolic pathway that would only sialylate EGFR--in otherwords subcellular accuracy. I don't think I've ever read of a way to specifically control glycosylation of a targeted single protein. I guess I simply don't agree with the authors' conclusions where they state that shutting down transferases might be a "bad" thing because it would promote EGFR dimers.
Apr
2
awarded  Supporter
Apr
2
revised EGFR, sialylation, and cancer progression
deleted 24 characters in body
Apr
2
asked EGFR, sialylation, and cancer progression
Mar
20
asked RACE pcr product
Mar
15
asked Sequencing rtPCR product
Mar
12
comment Are descriptive statistics sometimes more useful than tests of significance?
Very interesting response thank you. Does anyone in the community use Bayesian statistics rather than classical statistics as well to analyze their data? My understanding is that a Bayesian analysis will actually tell you the probability that YOUR hypothesis is correct based on data. Are journals accepting of Bayesian stats? It seems like a Bayesian analysis would also address the questions of false positives/negatives quite effectively.
Mar
12
awarded  Student
Mar
12
awarded  Editor
Mar
12
revised Are descriptive statistics sometimes more useful than tests of significance?
added 35 characters in body; edited title
Mar
12
asked Are descriptive statistics sometimes more useful than tests of significance?