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seen Oct 3 at 15:39

May
31
comment Can a postsynaptic neuron 'shut itself off?
AFAIK, receptors can not respond to stimuli if 1) they are modified in some way that it no longer binds its ligand, 2) modified in some way that the binding does not induce a change detectable inside the cell, 3) the old ligands are not cleared so any new signals are not noticed...these are the things I can think of right now...
May
31
comment Can a postsynaptic neuron 'shut itself off?
I think you might be onto the desentization of neurons. Here's a not very helpful Wiki link and a paper
Apr
27
awarded  Yearling
Feb
14
awarded  Commentator
Feb
14
comment Why do we dream?
There're so many theories...personally, I think dreaming is the brain trying to defragment, going over the past memories and getting rid of the connections that are not deemed as important. And this process of memory consolidation is seen as a dream. This explains why we often dream about the things that has happened during the day.
Feb
14
comment How do you express and detect GLP-1 receptors?
Try polyclonal antibodies. It might just be that your antibody isn't picking up the epitope.
Feb
14
answered Why can we breathe only oxygen?
Nov
1
asked Is there an evolutionary advantage for hamsters throwing up food when scared?
Aug
4
comment How are our senses dimmed during sleep?
That's a common theory, but the question is how? How are these 'receptors' weakened? What it is that controls both these receptors and sleep?
Jun
11
comment Autophagy in eukaryotic cells
Any papers by Daniel Klionsky and Beth Levine should definitely be used for reference, they are the two biggest names in the field today.
Jun
10
comment Autophagy in eukaryotic cells
To answer your question - you can distinguish the two processes as their place of origins, phagocytosis originates at the cell membrane and autophagy originates inside the cell. The phagocytotic process may feed into the autophagosomal process, although it may not be an requirement. If you read the review I suggested, you'll appreciate that some bacteria that is taken in using phagosomes, break out of their phagosomes and replicate in the cell. This is when autophagy can come in and restrict their replication. So I, a very crude distinction would be - phagocytosis outside, autophagy inside
Jun
10
comment Autophagy in eukaryotic cells
Having said this, no one is sure as to the origins of the autophagosome membrane - where the lipids are sourced from.
Jun
10
comment Autophagy in eukaryotic cells
Like I said, autophagosomes can take up any cargo - this includes other vesicles and phagosomes. The autophagosome is double-membraned, so when it fuses with the lysosome, the inner membrane is 'released' into the lumen of the lysosome, whereas the outer membrane fuses with that of the lysosome. Thus, the outer membrane of the autophagosome would resemble more of the lysosomal membrane (and they do share similar markers and it's often hard to distinguish the two in microscopy). This is different from the the membrane of phagosomes, which originate from the plasma membrane.
Jun
10
answered How can I learn about how cloning works in nature (twins)?
Jun
10
answered Autophagy in eukaryotic cells
Jun
9
awarded  Informed
Jun
2
awarded  Editor
Jun
2
revised Would non-human carnivores be able to survive on farmed foods?
Changed title into a question
Jun
2
answered How does one maintain balance sleepwalking?
Jun
2
awarded  Critic