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comment Is it possible there were multiple origins of life? And, if so, why did the one which became the common ancestor between all organisms prevail?
Closely related: biology.stackexchange.com/questions/14175/…
Aug
26
reviewed Close How to conduct a new protocol for antibody sequencing?
Aug
26
comment definition of phenotype
Your answer lacks references and completely ignores environmental effects and gene-environment interactions, which are large components of phenotype.
Aug
25
comment Why plants can not photosynthesize in presence of artificial light?
Exactly what are you asking? Plants can perform photosynthesis under suitable artificial light - see greenhouses or fluorescent tubes meant for plants.
Aug
25
comment Do biological phenomena follow Gaussian statistics?
1) this is really an emprirical question; sometimes it is, sometimes it isn't. Even if the "real" process is poisson, a normal distribution can still be a fairly accurate approximation. 2) intuition based "significance" and the technical concept of "statistic significance" needs to be clearly separated. If assumptions are met, an analysis might produce statistically significant results, while still being weak with rather shaky results.
Aug
25
comment Insect identification: white spotted beetle
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Aug
25
comment Insect identification: white spotted beetle
@Ilan I actually didn't see your edited answer or comment until after I posted my updated answer, since I didn't update my browser and tried to put together a more complete answer. That we independently suggest the same genus is a good sign though.
Aug
25
comment Insect identification: white spotted beetle
@Ilan So? That it is a Lamiinae is obvious. You should post answers when you think you have a good answer, not just add random guesses as early as possible. If you know the subfamily or tribe, post an answer saying that to help the OP in the right direction, and don't give an incorrect species-ID without a disclaimer, just to include a species name.
Aug
25
comment Insect identification: white spotted beetle
@Ilan You mean that you first IDed it incorrectly, and when I pointed this out you switchted to another, completely different, suggestion.
Aug
25
revised Insect identification: white spotted beetle
added probably species ID
Aug
25
answered Insect identification: white spotted beetle
Aug
25
revised Insect identification: white spotted beetle
added info from comment
Aug
25
comment Insect identification: white spotted beetle
I don't think this is correct. First, Monochamus scutellatus is a North American species. Second, species in Monochamus usually don't have a striped elytra with raised lines, so I don't think that the genus is correct. It is probably a species from Lamiinae though.
Aug
25
comment Insect identification: white spotted beetle
I don't think this is correct. First, Monochamus scutellatus is a North American species. Second, Monochamus usually don't have a striped elytra with raised lines, so I don't think that the genus is correct. It is probably a species from Lamiinae though.
Aug
24
comment Does polyploidy always isolate the polyploids from the diploid source population?
Very comprehensive and well referenced +1. I edited your answer to bring the general conclusion (for plants) to the forefront, and added a couple of headings. I hope you are fine with my suggestions - otherwise feel free to edit or rollback.
Aug
24
revised Does polyploidy always isolate the polyploids from the diploid source population?
Suggested edit to bring general conclusion to the front, along with some minor formatting.
Aug
24
comment what is this ant-sized black insect?
I don't think you can get a proper species-id based on that picture. It looks like a beetle though.
Aug
24
revised what is this ant-sized black insect?
added picture to post + minor edits
Aug
24
awarded  Revival
Aug
24
reviewed Close Genetics and Evolution