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Apr
13
comment Is it possible to have multiple stop codons in one exon?
@WYSIWYG That's exactly what I mean. The transfection experiment was a good 1st step, but I have a hard time imagining that cDNA under CMV or PGK promotion will not confound studying read-through (over expression or lenti incorporation as done in ref 1). I think oblating the second stop codon in the genome would be the ideal way to look at this. Also, we should probably move to chat after this, because I think we're diverging from the question.
Apr
12
comment Is it possible to have multiple stop codons in one exon?
@WYSIWYG My point was that wasn't endogenous. I was thinking a Crisper exp. would be more convincing than transient expression.
Apr
12
comment Is it possible to have multiple stop codons in one exon?
@MattDMo Quiet true. But given that when it happens, it's normally only a small portion of actual translation, that I don't think anyone is looking closely enough in the absence of some pathology. I suppose if a bioinforamtics PhD student wants to tackle this, you could look for cases in the human genome where there is an amber followed by another stop codon and see if you find read through on that gene (with 2nd stop oblated). I think it would be hard to get funding on it though. Checking PubMed, I'm pretty sure nobody is looking.
Apr
12
comment Is it possible to have multiple stop codons in one exon?
@MattDMo I certainly know of cases in cancers and viruses using host machinery. Off the top of my head I don't know of any endogenous examples in mammals, but one could look. I note the OP makes no mention in the question.
Apr
12
comment Is it possible to have multiple stop codons in one exon?
Right that appears to be the mechanism, but it should be noted that it's specific to the Amber stop codon. In bacteria and viruses you can often see doubling or even tripling up of stop codons to prevent Amber readthrough
Apr
12
comment Is it possible to have multiple stop codons in one exon?
I'm tempted to link articles from the sixties with me being so old. Amber is the most commonly read through stop codon throughout nature. sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014579305003224 for a modern example of how it's used
Mar
17
revised How to obtain bacteria samples at home?
edited body
Mar
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
19
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
29
reviewed Approve Does anyone know what type of Cocoon this is?
Oct
28
comment Batch several sequences for absent restriction sites
@Swbarnes2 that's backing out of using Biopython, but something we're considering. The actual full library we have is about 1200 enzymes, many of which with wildcards. I wanted to make sure something like that didn't already exist before we build it
Oct
28
comment Batch several sequences for absent restriction sites
@swbarnes2 I can, but that seems only practical so long as I keep the restrictionbatch small. Vs a real test of hundreds of enzymes is that practical?
Oct
28
asked Batch several sequences for absent restriction sites
Oct
23
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
19
comment Why are people unable to develop lasting immunity against Norovirus?
+1 I should point out, that my comment that I want to come back with an answer to this question is not because of a disagreement with anything here. Having worked on a culturing system for norovirus, I just have a lot of opinions on the matter. There are no italics extreme enough to to be apllied to the extreme difficulty in culturing, but I really appreciate that note :)
Sep
19
comment Why are people unable to develop lasting immunity against Norovirus?
I am soooo going you have to come back to this when I have time. I'm currently struggling with the scope I want to include (mucosal immunity, IgG vs IgM, HRV serotypes, noro infectious dose...). If I want to dive deep into the biology here would it be better to repost the question there Q/A style, or can juat do it here?
Sep
18
comment Heterocyst function in cyanobacteria and its localization
Though perhaps not relevant to the question, and certainly not true about any cyanobacteria that I know of, but just because something is a "cell" or single celled organism, does not mean it can't be contained within other cells. Mycoplasma, for example, do it all the time. Admittedly it doesn't normally end well for one group of cells, but it happens. +1
Sep
17
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
7
revised Why are siblings unidentical? (Which chromosome of the pair do gametes have?)
Added info per very correct comment
Sep
6
answered Why are siblings unidentical? (Which chromosome of the pair do gametes have?)