8,611 reputation
11542
bio website zoology.ubc.ca/~matthey
location Vancouver, Canada
age
visits member for 1 year, 3 months
seen 48 mins ago

My name is Remi Matthey-Doret and I am a PhD Candidate at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Department of Zoology in the lab of Mike Whitlock. I am a theoretician passionate about population genetics and conservation genetics.

Please have a look to my webpage for more information.


12h
answered Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium after 5 Generations
1d
comment More extreme phenotypes when parents are from diverged populations
If we assume that the parents are both heterozygous (for all loci under consideration) and all loci are bi-allelic and allele are additive, and parents are of any size, then indeed I would expect that the offspring from the parents form different origin will have higher range o possible genotypes. I am not sure my comments can help :) The question is very interesting +1
1d
comment More extreme phenotypes when parents are from diverged populations
If being tall is beneficial, the "tall" loci are probably (partially) dominant and therefore, two tall parents from different origin may be expected to have taller offspring than two parents from the same origin. It seems hard to me to draw such general conclusion as it really depends on the number of loci under consideration, on the pattern of dominance and on whether the parents are homo or hetero zygous (and on epistasis).
2d
revised How prominent is the gene-centric view of evolution among professional researchers?
added 144 characters in body
2d
revised How prominent is the gene-centric view of evolution among professional researchers?
added 144 characters in body
2d
comment Niche differentiation in birds of prey
Note that competitive exclusion states that the species should differ at least according to one axis of their ecological niche. Meaning that if their niche totally overlap in terms of source of food, it doesn't that they necessarily can't coexist theoretically speaking. I might be wrong though!
2d
comment Is there any complex organism that is both autotroph and heterotroph?
Do these slugs use inorganic carbon? Do they have a Calvin cycle of carbon fixation? If not, they only get energy from light, meaning that they are photoheterotroph and not autotroph.
2d
comment Is there any complex organism that is both autotroph and heterotroph?
I think the concept of autotrophy and heterotrophy is narrower than the one you are using here. They refer to the source of carbon and not just source of matter. If we accept that sundews are auto- and hetero- troph, then we'll have to accept that we (human) are also hetero- and auto- trophs as we are mining for salt.
Oct
22
revised How prominent is the gene-centric view of evolution among professional researchers?
added 16 characters in body
Oct
22
answered How prominent is the gene-centric view of evolution among professional researchers?
Oct
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
21
revised Why haven't land animals evolved beyond urination?
added 46 characters in body
Oct
20
accepted Are there multicellular isogamous species?
Oct
19
comment Why are recombination rates increasing in mammals?
Does chromosomal divergence cause speciation? Intuitively, I'd say yes. Assuming that chromosomal divergence would yield to outbreeding depression (OD), then OD causes post-zygotic isolation which causes a selection pressure to increase the pre-zygotic isolation. I have absolutely no idea however of whether such mechanisms is an important factor to explain speciation in mammals and I might be wrong assuming that chromosomal divergence causes OD.
Oct
19
comment Why are recombination rates increasing in mammals?
With low recombination chromosomes diverge following the same logic that makes two non-interbreeding population to diverge through time (just by the neutral processes of mutations and drift).
Oct
19
revised Are there multicellular isogamous species?
deleted 87 characters in body; edited title
Oct
19
revised How many cells in apical meristem
added 2 characters in body
Oct
18
comment Ancestral states of sex determination system
No, I don't have it. I very often want to buy it but I stop right before doing so when I see its price! I read part of this book during my master degree, just before it got published for a class I attended at the University of Lausanne with Nicolas Perrin (one of the two authors) and I really appreciate it. It was for me a totally new subject and the book made a good job to introduce me into it. I also thought that the book makes a good job of providing both a good theoretical understanding and a rather impressive list of study cases separately into different paragraphs.
Oct
18
comment Cost of Substitution explained
Without reading the article, I would tend to think that the cost of substitution correspond to the addition of loads for a given new mutation that will get fixed, where the load at any given time is the difference between the fitness of the best possible genotype $MM$ (homozygote for the beneficial mutant allele) and the realized mean fitness of the population ($x_t^2W_{wt,wt} + 2x(1-x)W_{Wt,M} + (1-x_t)^2W_{MM}$), where $W_{H,G}$ if the fitness of the individuals having variants $H$ and $G$ and $x_t$ is the frequency of the wildtype allele at time $t$. $w_t$ means wildtype allele.
Oct
18
comment Ancestral states of sex determination system
Yes, as argued in Evolution of Sex Determination all liability factor (factor that define the sex relative to a threshold) follows a norm of reaction and therefore the concept of GSD makes sense only by defining the range of environmental condition where which the sex is only defined by the genes. But I think my question is still of interest even to the light of a more accurate definition of GSD and ESD.