10,368 reputation
11647
bio website zoology.ubc.ca/~matthey
location Vancouver, Canada
age
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen 2 hours ago

My name is Remi Matthey-Doret and I am a PhD Candidate at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Department of Zoology in the lab of Mike Whitlock. I am passionate evolution in general and more specifically about population genetics and conservation genetics.

Please have a look to my webpage for more information.


10h
revised How to define “Quasifixation” in continuous approximation of finite population?
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1d
revised Gender and age-specific mutation rate in plants
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1d
revised Gender and age-specific mutation rate in plants
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1d
accepted Receptors for red and far-red light in plants: Shade avoidance
1d
comment Receptors for red and far-red light in plants: Shade avoidance
So the mechanism seems much simpler than what I expected. The ratio is directly "computed" by the phytochrome and the ratio is not "calculated" from the interaction between the molecular pathways activated by the phytochromes. Thanks a lot. I will clearly have a look to the paper your attached.
1d
comment Is it correct to run ANOVA for two experiment groups of microarray data?
Your 1st question is off-topic. And there should not have two questions per post. I know nothing about "microarray software", so I can't help you. For the 1st question: Yes, it is ok to make an Anova if your explanatory variable has only two levels. You will probably not need any non-parametric test. Today's parametric tests are often robust enough and can handle all sorts of experimental design. You should ask your question (and make sure to fully describe your variables) on CrossValidated.SE
1d
comment why male penis not considered as cartilage?
Btw, Are you sure the Botany tag was a good choice? The tag human-biology or anatomy would be better choices.
1d
comment why male penis not considered as cartilage?
Welcome to BiologyBeta. Everything is not either cartilage or bone. We have many other tissues. Have a look to this wiki article. The penis contain neither bones nor cartilage.
Jan
26
comment Why do the proportion of predators increase at mass extinction events?
Interesting question. Do you know whether this pattern repeat with the 3 other mass extinctions? Can you please link to the article who produced this figure? That will probably help.
Jan
26
comment After how many generations descendant is not more related to ancestor, than to a random individual in an ancestral population?
Welcome to Biology.SE. Your question sounds like a Coalescent theory question. Do you assume that no mutations and no selection in your model? The answer will very likely depend on the population size.
Jan
25
comment Relationship Between Evolution and the Increase of Entropy of Earth
The second law of thermodynamic states the entropy can only increases in a closed system. Life is definitely not a closed system. I think that this question would be a better fit for physics.SE
Jan
25
comment Largest direct ancestor of humans
@terdon Indeed, Dimetrodon (sphenacontidae) is a Synapsida(position on tolweb). the fact that sister species of mammals are quite big suggested that the direct ancestor of mammals might have been big. Looking at the tolweb tree, again, it would be interested to know what cutleria, panetelosaurus, paleohatteria and other closely related groups look like.
Jan
24
comment Largest direct ancestor of humans
Oh well. I didn't know about the Dimetrodon. I had in mine that when the first mammals came to existence, they were quite small but that sounds totally wrong when considering the Dimetrodon and the size of the basal mammals (monotremata and marsupials).
Jan
24
comment Largest direct ancestor of humans
In the absence of fossile records, the standard method for estimating te phenotype of a given ancestor species is to take the average phenotype of the descendent. Such methods is unlikely to give a result indicating a very tall ancestor. Primates tend to be smaller than humans, first mammals were very small, amphibians (sister group) are small, fishes are smaller than humans as well. You can go over the phylogeny here
Jan
24
comment Largest direct ancestor of humans
I would tend to think that the tallest individual of a given human lineage is just a Homo sapiens, but I am really not sure. Is there a reason why you are specifically interested in human lineage?
Jan
22
comment Cell evolution: immortality vs reproduction
As I understand your answer @Kendall, you explain the impact of environmental stress on cell behaviour (Should I reproduce now or not?) but not how populations living in stressful environment evolve. Is that right? It sounds likely to me that a response that a stressful environment such as would evolve to decrease through time as the population is evolving to a constant stressful environment.
Jan
22
comment Could we engineer humans to behave like insects?
Well, this is rather true. We could also take population size, mutation rate, genome size and various environmental changes and their associated selection pressures. But it gets a impossible to disentangle causes from consequences.
Jan
22
reviewed Approve Could we engineer humans to behave like insects?
Jan
22
revised Could we engineer humans to behave like insects?
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Jan
22
answered Could we engineer humans to behave like insects?