1,265 reputation
512
bio website
location UK
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Apr 16 at 12:05

Systems Biology PhD Student at the Sainsbury Laboratory, Cambridge University.


  • Entomologist at the Natural History Museum, London
  • MRes Entomology from Imperial College London
  • Background in mathematics, physics, and biology
  • Interested in transcription control networks, plant-insect interactions, beetle phylogenetics
  • Enjoy mathematical modelling and programming

Dec
5
comment Cell life: division for immortality or reproduction with aging
Also the website of the Jun group (where the Wang et al. paper came from) is excellent: jun.ucsd.edu lovely videos showing the mother machine in action!
Dec
5
comment Cell life: division for immortality or reproduction with aging
Great answer, and those are the same reference papers I would have referred to. Although the Wang et al. paper suggests that there is no difference between the mother and daughter cell, and that cell death is independent of growth (and that there is not a reduction in division rate with age). The idea being that the result from Stewart et al. was due to the older cells being in the middle of the colony with fewer available nutrients.
Aug
3
comment Why *don't* all ants have wings?
Many smaller winged insects use the wind to aid dispersal, see this paper for example. Wings are extremely useful in many situations, hence their evolution despite the major energy investment.
Jun
30
comment Why do ants live so long?
Glad I could help. I really enjoyed reading about it and strongly recommend following the links as it's a really interesting topic to think about.
Jun
30
comment Why do ants live so long?
:) thanks very much!
Jun
27
comment Are there any other animals that become attached to a non-living object?
This doesn't really answer the question, it gives more examples of human attachment and a vague reference to non-human primates. I think it would have been better as a comment.
Jun
20
comment When has an organism evolved enough to be called a new species?
Amongst taxonomists - who define and name species - there are 'lumpers' and 'splitters' who choose larger taxa with more diversity, and smaller with less respectively. The problem exists even for professionals where it ultimately becomes a personal preference.
Jun
20
comment When has an organism evolved enough to be called a new species?
As another example of why the dictionary definition is not always applicable; the two breeds of dog, great dane and chihuahua are unable to breed successfully but are still considered to be the same species due to their genetic similarity.
Mar
3
comment How strong is spider silk?
This answer isn't an answer, it would have been more appropriate as a comment.
Feb
10
comment If I put a cup over a spider, and leave it there for a day, will the spider survive?
My references are included in my answer above.
Feb
8
comment If I put a cup over a spider, and leave it there for a day, will the spider survive?
The assertion that it will be weakened is wrong, according to the literature which I have consulted. Further I am dubious about your assertion that weakened spiders will travel more slowly. Unless you can back up these statements with some evidence, I will be voting your answer down.