311 reputation
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location Auckland, New Zealand
age 23
visits member for 9 months
seen Apr 13 at 11:53

Oct
8
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
17
awarded  Quorum
Feb
26
accepted Is there a hypothesis that attempts to explain patterns of species richness along all three energy-related environmental gradients?
Feb
26
accepted Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
Jan
17
comment Is there a hypothesis that attempts to explain patterns of species richness along all three energy-related environmental gradients?
Now let's get back to our temperature/energy thing, maybe I do need to paraphrase the question a little. I was mainly referring to the amount of solar radiation available for photosynthesis. You can't really call it temperature, can you? Does it answer your question or not really? But with this definition, I'm not too sure whether the amount of solar energy decreases with increasing altitude... If it doesn't, than maybe "energy" doesn't correlate with all three gradients either. Also see my question under the fileunderwater's post, maybe we should answer it first.
Jan
17
comment Is there a hypothesis that attempts to explain patterns of species richness along all three energy-related environmental gradients?
Yes, even though both you and fileunderwater wrote great answers, I must admit that I did know about the Wiki article you cited, and I read some literature on LDG too... but I thought I should ask about the three gradients combined, not just LDG, partly because I have no idea where to look for an answer to this phrasing, partly because I'm curious, and partly because I didn't want to make you write me a book with all these theories listed :-) Thanks anyway. I still hope someone else might chew this up for me so I have only to swallow, but if not, I'm happy to dig deeper into this myself too.
Jan
17
comment Is there a hypothesis that attempts to explain patterns of species richness along all three energy-related environmental gradients?
I tried to squeeze everything in one comment, but what the heck. I actually remember doing a presentation for an ecology seminar at uni on this very Mittelbach paper :-) I absolutely agree that there might be no actual answer to this question (but that's why I agreed to accept even flawed hypothesis that attempt to explain the three gradients). I also agree that the best way to answer it is to read everything you cited... but to be honest, I was looking for a shortcut specifically on the three gradients together :-D Just saying, I'm still grateful for your answer.
Jan
17
comment Is there a hypothesis that attempts to explain patterns of species richness along all three energy-related environmental gradients?
Cheers, @Remi.b. As to your paragraph 1, if it's temperature, than the foot of the mountain should have the highest biodiversity, no? Next issue, due to the gravity, shouldn't the seeds move much more easily down the gradient (which, again, would contribute to the biodiversity of the lowest region). Finally, even if the middle patch receives more gene flow, it should reduce species richness, because gene flow acts against speciation, no?
Jan
17
comment Is there a hypothesis that attempts to explain patterns of species richness along all three energy-related environmental gradients?
What about the plants that your bees ate, did they exhibit the same trend? I also don't get your randomness explanation: if it is a uniform distribution, by chance alone the bees should be distributed, well, uniformly, no?
Jan
17
comment Is there a hypothesis that attempts to explain patterns of species richness along all three energy-related environmental gradients?
Well, I guess they are biologically rich environments, but they would be an exception to the general rule where the deeper you go, the less sunlight penetrates the water, the less plankton to eat there are, the colder it gets, and even the pressure is higher (which is not related to energy). So I guess overall there is such a gradient.
Jan
17
comment Is there a hypothesis that attempts to explain patterns of species richness along all three energy-related environmental gradients?
Thanks, it does. I have a simple question that you should be able to answer without any research (maybe add it to your post?), and which I tried to include in my original question too: "What's wrong with just saying that all these gradients correlate with the amount of solar energy available for primary producers?" I can't seem to answer it myself. Is the difference in solar radiation really significant for plants in tropics and temperate regions? Is there really less available solar energy at higher altitudes? Does it fail to explain some biodiversity hot-spots outside tropics? Cheers.
Jan
15
comment Is there a hypothesis that attempts to explain patterns of species richness along all three energy-related environmental gradients?
@Remi.b I meant energy + water availability in my desert example. Ok, it's getting a bit confusing. Let's go back to where it all started: "[C]an your question be reduced to 'How does temperature influence species diversity'"? No, I don't think so, because: 1) not species diversity but rather patterns of species richness (gradients) 2) temperature could be one hypothesis, but I believe that there is such a hypothesis and it's flawed. However, I cannot tell you right now with high confidence how exactly it is flawed, I wouldn't ask if I knew everything. I still haven't read the answers though.
Jan
15
comment Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
Rodrigo, ok, most of subspecies and "races" in zoology don't have DNA analyzed but are still considered to be separate. However, in the case of humans it is analyzed, so it would make sense to apply this information if it indicates that humans cannot be grouped in races, wouldn't it? (whether that's what our DNA indicates or not is another, not mentioned by you, question)
Jan
15
awarded  Critic
Jan
15
revised Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
deleted 63 characters in body
Jan
15
revised Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
added 76 characters in body
Jan
15
comment Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
@terdon, I'm sorry, I didn't mean to affect your answer, so I removed this bit from the question.
Jan
15
comment Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
Good argument, Rodrigo, I don't see how I could contradict right now. One thing though, just because SE is a little like Wikipedia in terms that we try to save good and detailed answers for future reference by other users, if you could edit your answer to express this idea, you would definitely get a +1 from me, and potentially an "accepted answer" too.
Jan
15
revised Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
added 29 characters in body; edited title
Jan
15
revised Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
added 29 characters in body; edited title