2,897 reputation
21141
bio website
location United States
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 8 hours ago

Neuronerd.


14h
comment How big a box would it take to hold all of humanity?
Stack Exchange is more about questions that have definitive answers. There's lots of questions like "What if humans had tails?" which would be fun to speculate on, but this site is meant to be a repository of information rather than a discussion board.
14h
comment How big a box would it take to hold all of humanity?
Aside from the "Gee Whiz" value, those masses can be used for estimates of food resources for various interrelationships in the food web. Humans aren't really raw prey for anything, so I think without such a purpose for the results, it's just trivia at best.
15h
comment How big a box would it take to hold all of humanity?
What's the point here?
Oct
18
comment How do the pharmacodynamics of the NSAIDs differ and are there “resistant” COX phenotypes?
@Masi Thanks for your answer! I meant whether there were differences in fat solubility, etc., between the different drugs.
Oct
18
comment About the plight of Elephants and efforts to conserve them?
I don't think this is really answerable one way or the other. Poachers may not look carefully enough to see what they are aiming at, or worse, the yellow horn might attract more predators. Failing that anyone's actually studied this issue, the answers are just going to be a matter of opinion.
Oct
14
comment Should my colleague be worried about having a black dot under his skin?
No need to be sorry. I didn't meant that to be harsh, just matter-of-fact.
Oct
14
comment Should my colleague be worried about having a black dot under his skin?
Medical advice questions are off-topic here. In addition to that, even if it were on-topic, it would be too broad. A science lab could contain hundreds of substances that may or may not be toxic.
Oct
14
comment When the mind is highly active, roughly how many neurons become excited in one second?
What do you mean by "happen"? Synapses can be strengthened by ongoing activity (or weakened by a lack of it), but they don't really appear out of nowhere on that timecourse.
Oct
9
comment Does the Jungian notion of collective unconsciousness have any legitimacy in the light of modern neurobiology and epigenetics?
Peripherally related: cogsci.stackexchange.com/questions/1116/…
Oct
9
comment Does the Jungian notion of collective unconsciousness have any legitimacy in the light of modern neurobiology and epigenetics?
@Superbest I would agree to an extent, but I think that the epigenetic/evolutionary aspect is better handled here.
Oct
6
comment What's the evolutionary reason behind decussation?
Related: biology.stackexchange.com/questions/3807/…
Sep
26
comment How were the synaptic areas identified in the somatic sensation pathways?
Check out the work of Denny-Brown in humans. I suspect this work that you describe was done much earlier, but you may be able to follow some of the references backwards from him.
Sep
25
comment Why do different pain killers have different effects on people?
Related: biology.stackexchange.com/questions/2922/…
Sep
23
comment Evolutionary motivation behind number of neurons in DCMMP
The species you want to look at for this are giraffes and, to some extent, elephants. This article is talking about information flow in the other direction (corticospinal tract) but it might have some insights into the sensory pathways. I did not read it yet, though.
Sep
20
comment How the conjunctivitis virus spread just by seeing a person's eye who is infected
The sunglasses are worn because eyes that are infected are more sensitive to light. It has nothing to do with infecting other people, and has absolutely nothing to do with someone catching the infection while looking at the eye.
Sep
15
comment Could this Francobelgian comic book woman really have these 4 diseases at the same time?
This is fine for the site. The disease process is definitely a part of the biology. We're more concerned about people asking for personal treatment advice than anything.
Sep
7
comment How does core-conductor model correspond to an actual neuron?
The core conductor model is very limited in scope. It may be helpful for you to take a look at Hodgkin and Huxley's work with the compartmental models as a way of exploring the limitations of cable theory.
Sep
7
comment How does core-conductor model correspond to an actual neuron?
and the potassium efflux. There are different subtypes of these potassium channels as well (so Rm take a lot of information about conductances/resistances and jams it down into one component). My "grounds" in my circuit are a bit exaggerated, since the currents leaving and entering the axon can propagate through the ions in the extracellular milieu. I just wanted to illustrate that the conductances could be split off into the different components, but it was still justifiable to combine them.
Sep
7
comment How does core-conductor model correspond to an actual neuron?
@IllegalImmigrant The breaks (nodes of Ranvier) on the myelin sheath are modeled by the electrical nodes between the horizontal resistors in your model. These are the only places between the hillock of the axon (the pointy part at the end of the cell body) and the terminal where ions are being exchanged. At the other points along the axon, the receptors are covered over by the myelin, so no current leaks out with the movement of the ions. The vertical resistors are realistic, they just betray the complexity of the actual voltage-gated influx through sodium channels
Sep
7
comment How does core-conductor model correspond to an actual neuron?
That's probably clear as mud, and I've glossed over a lot, so feel free to ask questions and I'll fill in the gaps.