2,026 reputation
520
bio website github.com/yamad
location Boston, MA
age 29
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Sep 25 at 20:55

PhD candidate in neurobiology/neuroscience. Current research focused on membrane electrophysiology.


Feb
7
revised Question about equilibrium potential formula
Fixed typo in log base change
Feb
7
answered Question about equilibrium potential formula
Feb
6
awarded  Custodian
Feb
6
reviewed Reviewed Do cold blooded animals generate any heat?
Feb
6
reviewed Excellent How do multiple replication forks function without 'colliding', and what is the benefit of this method?
Feb
6
reviewed Needs Improvement How does prolonged exposure to high frequency noise affect hearing?
Feb
6
reviewed Satisfactory Conjugate secondary antibody
Feb
6
reviewed Needs Improvement What chemical or biochemical agents do plants use to inhibit each other's growth?
Feb
6
reviewed Satisfactory Why Do Ruminants Require A Multi-Compartment Stomach To Digest Food?
Feb
6
awarded  Custodian
Feb
6
reviewed Needs Improvement How much gas is exchanged in one human breath?
Feb
5
comment Extraretinal photoreception in mammals?
Possible duplicate: biology.stackexchange.com/q/700/72
Feb
5
comment Extraretinal photoreception in mammals?
-1. It is well-established that opsins are expressed widely, but their functions are not known. It hasn't been convincingly shown anywhere that human opsins confer light sensitivity to any cells other than those in the retina. The knee study you mentioned has been refuted (see my comment here: biology.stackexchange.com/a/704/72). Also, a point of nomenclature, photoreceptors are cells that are sensitive to light, and opsins are called photopigments when they are bound to a chromophore and are sensitive to light.
Feb
2
comment What is the point of being selection-free?
I agree that they are trying to demonstrate a method that will be applicable for in vivo gene therapy. The results are suggestive of some rate of efficacy for in vivo repair. However, an 18% fraction of repaired cells in a dish does not point to, or even imply, an 18% fraction of repaired cells in a body.
Feb
1
comment What is the point of being selection-free?
-1. "This implies that if their treatment were applied to living tissue, 18% of the cells would be repaired in situ." Not at all. If only it were true that findings in a dish could draw such a straight line to results in the body!
Jan
29
revised Do adjacent axons in a nerve influence each other?
added 562 characters in body
Jan
29
answered Do adjacent axons in a nerve influence each other?
Jan
25
comment Why have humans evolved conciousness?
-1. The substantive part of this answer assumes the common misconception that only humans are intelligent and conscious, and that we somehow know this for a fact.
Jan
25
comment Why have humans evolved conciousness?
-1. Your question and comments are philosophical, not biological, and therefore not appropriate for this site. You seem to believe that evolution can't possibly explain it, and therefore there is really no science to be discussed. Read up on the philosopher David Chalmers, who agrees with you. Then read up on his main rival, Daniel Dennett. Note that when you get into these sorts of questions, your intuition about whether you "know" that you are "self-aware" and how to "prove" it are destined to fail.
Dec
14
awarded  Yearling