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"Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the values you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memory of your loved ones. I am not afraid."

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Jul
13
revised Are human bodies programmed to die?
thanks Richard for your comments; added 99 characters in body
Jul
13
comment What is the “lifecycle” of an average eschar and what types of cells are involved in each stage?
I thought that scabs were essentially just a protective layer of dried-out and tightly bound platelets (etc) that eventually came-away when the tissue underneath had properly formed/healed, rather than forming the new tissue themselves. Not my field though!
Jul
13
comment Why would deers keep crossing a river full of crocodiles while some of them have been killed?
What's with the down-votes? At least give a reason!
Jul
12
comment Are human bodies programmed to die?
@RichardSmith right OK, I see where you're coming from, but not how to re-word what I am saying; that a trait that increases the relative (strictly Darwinian) 'fitness' of a species can be selected for at the 'cost' of a shorter life to an individual organism. This may be disadvantageous in some terms, because they will have less time to reproduce, however higher population turnover will be advantageous in fast-changing conditions.
Jul
12
comment Are human bodies programmed to die?
@RichardSmith I'll try to find where I read that last section, but I don't see how group selection can been disproven in that manner. Evolution acts on the genes, not on individuals. If it is advantageous for a group of genes (e.g. the genome of a species) to have a high turnover, giving greater evolvability (i.e. more chance of survival in changing conditions) then it will come at the 'cost' (shorter life) to the individual.
Jul
12
revised Are human bodies programmed to die?
spelling, and realized just how many times I used the word 'inherent'
Jul
12
answered Are human bodies programmed to die?
Jul
12
accepted Have any mutations or genetic loci been associated with exceptional longevity in humans?
Jul
12
comment Can rats pass on memories of a maze to their offspring?
+1 nice, interesting, detailed answer.
Jul
11
comment Is ovum + ovum fertilization possible for human?
Wouldn't this only result in female progeny if all the DNA is of female origin?
Jul
10
comment What is an simple way to burn glucose for visible effect?
cool. does this actually work? And is it within the confines of a not expensive or dangerous chemical? I know little about MnO2 other than what I've just learned from Google!
Jul
10
comment Human perception of time depending on age
interesting way of putting it - I think this is very similar to Jeff's answer actually; it is all about how familiar you are with a situation
Jul
10
comment effect of background selection on promoter regions compared to distant enhancers?
So are you suggesting that negative selection (natural selection against a trait) may be stronger on enhancers that are more distant for the gene itself? I haven't seen any, but will keep an eye out! This would probably be a (relatively) simple and interesting bioinformatic/phylogenetic analysis given a proper framework. I expect it will very much depend on which gene/promotion mechanism you are looking at - unless the question is 'any'?
Jul
9
comment How does a jumping spider manage to “jump” on the ceiling?
Whilst I've seen no evidence either, your hypothesis that the spider uses its silk seems highly likely; small spiders are known to 'balloon', using their silk to float through the air en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballooning_(spider). Using their silk to 'pounce' on prey seems very plausible.
Jul
5
comment Autosomal Recessive Trait when skipping one generation
Is this not just down to chance? A recessive trait may not skip a generation if the right mix of alleles are still passed to the progeny, but a dominant trait would always (by definition) be present in the offspring. I imagine there's a much better answer/way of saying this!
Jul
5
comment Do gene expression levels necessarily correspond to levels of protein activation?
@bobthejoe it does seem like it would be a fruitless experiment - doesn't mean no one has looked though (in fact I am surprised there isn't more literature on it). If no one else has found any then I will either accept one of the answers already given or post my own combining the evidence against any correlation.
Jul
5
awarded  Enthusiast
Jul
4
revised Do gene expression levels necessarily correspond to levels of protein activation?
spelling
Jul
3
comment Paralogous genes in genome-wide association studies?
That is an interesting question (thanks for the expansion). If the paralogous genes were still functionally related there is likely to be redundancy between them, so a SNP in one of the copies may not manifest at all. A SNP that affects a sub-trait specific to one of the copies would need to have a massive effect (or the study would require a phenomonal sample size) to find it (unless it was a targeted study only on paralogous genes known to be disease related?). I don't know fo any studies, but will be interested in others answers!
Jul
3
comment Paralogous genes in genome-wide association studies?
Hello. Could you help by clarifying your question? Do you want to know whether paralogous genes/regions are over-represented in GWAS hits? It is an interesting hypothesis - have you any ideas/references why this may be the case? It's always best to give as full and clear a question as possible. Thanks