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"Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the values you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memory of your loved ones. I am not afraid."

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Aug
4
comment Animal altruism?
another cool example: bear rescues crow! youtube.com/watch?v=gJ_3BN0m7S8
Feb
14
comment GO terms for non-model organisms
interesting question, but no experience doing this from me. Have you tried BioStars.org?
Oct
20
comment How to measure bacterial content
@Hurda I'm afraid not - I've not used them myself, just found them by searching on the internet. Find one with some good reviews!
Oct
11
comment Negative value on linear gene expression in microarrays
Anything below the background threshold is by definition an unreliable signal (i.e. detection P-value > 0.05). The 2 options for dealing with this is either to set values below the background threshold to "missing", or to leave them in but be aware that below the background threshold the values are no longer meaningful (you might do this if, for instance, 60% of your sample were below background for this probe, but the rest were above - this is still meaningful because it means that 60% of your sample express less than the 40%, so you do not want to set them as missing, as this may be relevant
Oct
9
comment Negative value on linear gene expression in microarrays
This is pretty spot on. The "intensity" values you end up getting are relative values to the background levels. These tend to be normalized to an arbitrary value - "100" could be the arbitrary threshold for background, above which you see a reliable signal. A probe with very low intensity could therefore be below 0.
Sep
30
comment Why do some trees have a life span, while some don't?
The answer to (this question) may be relevant to you. I didn't see your question until now, and it is very similar to a recent question I answered!
Sep
28
comment RNA-seq Data on domestic animal with different environment
There's also the ArrayExpress database maintained by the EBI.
Sep
24
comment What are the effects of muscle and fat mass on survivability?
Is this question specifically about resilience to falls/impacts? Or does this question also include disease risk? A major factor would be the age of the people in question... for instance, a high BMI is predictive of increased cardiovascular risk when younger, but in aged individuals (>65) a high BMI is actually protective, which may be due to an inverse correlation with frailty, or other complicating factor. Also, if you down-vote, provide a constructive comment for the poster.
Sep
22
comment What would life expectancy be in the western world in the absence of Ischemic heart disease?
This will be a tough question to answer, but people tend to die from one of only a handful of age-related diseases (other deaths are either infection related, accidental, or "rare" diseases).
Sep
20
comment GWAS: matched-pairs and logistic regression
@Benjamin I find that the published packages are only so useful - they're great for performing simple analyses via an established pipeline - but there is no substitute for creating an analysis that actually fits your data. Unless there truly is an established, published method, it is better to adapt one to your specific situation - all experiments are different and have their own considerations!
May
16
comment What reasons allow for women to outlive men?
@LanceLafontaine just been reading this article which is very interesting
May
13
comment Does anyone know what marsupial this is?
I think the OP could have included information like where the photo was taken? But still I am inclined to agree - I have seen many similar questions on here that were not closed.
May
11
comment Exercise causes number of cell divisions to approach Hayflick limit faster? And hence shorten life expectancy?
@shigeta the injured fibres (fused myogenic cells) are removed prior to "healing" (replacement with new fibres), or so I understand it. There may be degrees on damage that can be repaired without total removal, but generally I think the old is cleared to make room for new, stronger fibres (hence muscle being stronger after training (i.e. damage following exercise))
May
10
comment Is there any kind of immortality in plants?
Just found this amazing example of a really old tree - >4000 years old! ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11295507
Feb
27
comment Is there any kind of immortality in plants?
Hi there. There is a somewhat similar question here (biology.stackexchange.com/questions/2055/…) that I have posted an answer to.
Jan
26
comment Why are 3 nucleotides used as codons for amino-acid mapping in DNA?
@Kevin thanks, and you are absolutely right. I have given the answer a general re-work because I don't think it flowed properly having been adapted from a different question, and have taken your comment into account. Many thanks.
Jan
26
comment Why are 3 nucleotides used as codons for amino-acid mapping in DNA?
I have asked and answered this here because I had posted this answer to the linked question, but that was not truely answering it. There are now much better alternative answers, so I have asked the question I actually answered here!
Jan
5
comment Why does human facial and head hair continue to grow?
Another closely related question
Dec
12
comment Athletes: nature vs. nurture?
Hi @rg255 - thanks for the information and your opinions, but I was hoping for links to studies (like the one in your comment) where authors have tested for genetic contributions. I am of course expecting a large environmental contribution, but as you suggest the genetic contributions may be sport specific (e.g. height-increasing alleles for basketballers, bulk-increasing alleles for sumo-wrestling... etc). When I have some time later I will follow-up the paper you have sent, as this is quite an old study and have been cited almost 200 times! Clearly some other studies too. Many thanks.
Dec
5
comment Is cell senescence in culture comparable to that in vivo?
Many thanks indeed for your input, and the links.