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location Baltimore, MD
age 29
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Mar 25 at 23:14

PhD candidate in the department of biophysics at Johns Hopkins.


Jan
19
comment Why is ATP the main nucleoside triphosphate used to exchange energy?
In terms of experiments, you could find an organism (probably some extremophile archaea or something) that produces mostly GTP during glycolysis in place of ATP. Alternatively, you could synthetically alter one of the ATP producing enzymes so that they instead produce GTP. Either one would provide strong evidence that the preference for using ATP in metabolism is mostly a matter of coincidence.
Jan
19
comment Why is ATP the main nucleoside triphosphate used to exchange energy?
@user137 Yes, so maybe the best version of the question is "Why ATP and not GTP?", since the two molecules are so similar in terms of their chemistry and biological role.
Jan
19
comment Why is ATP the main nucleoside triphosphate used to exchange energy?
This was a question I too asked, during intro biochem. I still don't know the answer. I'm not sure if there's a satisfactory one beyond "evolutionary contingency".
Jan
16
comment What effects does being cryogenically frozen have on a person's body?
@Chris wrong! Well, maybe. Check out this frog
Jan
10
comment What does the gene name “lexA” stand for?
What does gene name X stand for? I think you might be expecting a little bit too much from the standard naming conventions...
Jan
7
comment How much does sleeping correlate with daily activity?
@rumtscho Really, just like the OP I'm wondering why both a day of hard labor and a day of hard thinking leave me similarly tired. It's a curious symmetry.
Jan
7
comment Which fruit compounds affect the speed of fructose absorption?
@inf3rno look up the teapot fallacy
Jan
7
comment How much does sleeping correlate with daily activity?
@ChrisStronks yes but why? Why does heavy mental and heavy physical labor produce equivalent global fatigue when they are fundamentally so very different, down to the actual organs under load?
Jan
7
comment Which fruit compounds affect the speed of fructose absorption?
@inf3rno Your thing only really applies to fruit wrapped in Eucalyptus leaves. Unless you're claiming that the magical unidentified substance within eucalyptus leaf extract that is supposed to suppress adiposity is present in all fruits, which the authors certainly don't
Jan
6
comment Kinetic binding / unbinding constants of protein + mRNA ⇌ mRNP
@user137 build his own fluorescence detector for their HPLC neat
Jan
6
comment Kinetic binding / unbinding constants of protein + mRNA ⇌ mRNP
@user137 for future reference, there are many experiments that can be used to determine kinetic rates. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR), stop flow spectroscopy, kinetic ELISA, and many others. There's even a lab in my department working on getting binding/unbinding rates from single-molecule microscopy data.
Jan
6
comment Kinetic binding / unbinding constants of protein + mRNA ⇌ mRNP
The keyword that you're missing is kinetic. You want the kinetic binding constants/rates. And @user137 is right, this type of data is sadly uncommon, but if all you're interested in is OOM it might be possible... maybe. I'll take a look.
Jan
6
comment Single long axon vs serial neurons
I'm not a neruo guy, so I can't give you any specifics, but in terms of general information theory/2nd law considerations, every time you convert a signal from one form to another (axonal current to neurotransmitter gradient, say) your signal/noise ratio gets a little worse. You can recover the original signal somewhat, but it always involves an expense of free energy.
Jan
6
comment Single long axon vs serial neurons
Forget conduction speed. What about signal fidelity? How much noise does each extra gap junction add to a signal?
Dec
31
comment Are There Rules for How Proteins Are Formed?
Your question is a bit unclear. What do you mean by how? Are you trying to ask if there are any rules for which amino acid follows which amino acid? Or are you trying to ask about how proteins fold?
Dec
31
comment Are There Exceptions to Animal Cells not Having Cell Walls?
@anongoodnurse which got me thinking about whether cell wall vs ECM is a difference without a distinction, but I cut that part out of my answer as it didn't really add anything to it. I might put that up myself as a separate question once I've looked into it a bit.
Dec
31
comment Are There Exceptions to Animal Cells not Having Cell Walls?
@anongoodnurse yeah, I figured it was something like that too. I just wanted to make super clear to the OP that, at least in terms of nomenclature, animals definitely do not have cell walls.
Dec
31
comment If ants have an antibiotic gland, how can they spread hospital infections?
Human beings also have many glands which secrete antibiotic fluid, including our tear ducts. Yet humans are certainly an important source of infectious bacteria.
Dec
31
comment Relative sweetness
@augurar good call on neural adaptation. I originally mistakenly called it "habituation" in my answer, which it turns out is slightly different.
Dec
30
comment Why isn't the insertion of a single nucleotide destructive for DNA?
However I know from theory that a single nucleotide insertion is not dangerous in most cases. Do you have a citation for that?