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7h
comment Why do we have two of some organs, but not all?
The body appears so symmetrical mainly due to the musculoskeletal system and a handful of large organs.
7h
comment Why do we have two of some organs, but not all?
We don't have that many double organs (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_organs_of_the_human_body): Most of musculoskeletal system. Digestive: salivary glands. Respiratory: bronchi/lungs. Urinary: kidneys&ureters. Reproductive: ovaries/testes + tubes. Endocrine: parathyroids (four even), adrenals. Circulatory: Mostly two for minor vessels, lymph nodes, bone marrow. Nervous system: Mostly two in PNS, two eyes & ears. Plus mammary glands. Everything else usually exists only once (though possibly symmetrical).
Apr
28
awarded  Yearling
Apr
21
reviewed Approve Why doesn't the rest of the body have something like the “blood-brain” barrier to protect itself from pathogens?
Mar
21
accepted How do nuclear receptors locate each other to form a DNA loop?
Mar
15
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
15
revised Why do we like salt?
added 782 characters in body
Mar
2
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
2
accepted Why are pilots under the illusion of gaining altitude without doing so?
Nov
28
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
22
accepted What can cause incompatible sticky ends to be ligated?
Sep
22
accepted How to calculate virus titre from qPCR
Sep
22
comment Do single crossovers occur in circular polynucleotides?
I'm accepting this answer because my understanding has improved in the meantime. As it is not possible to image recombination events as they happen (yet), it isn't possible to answer this conclusively.
Sep
22
accepted Do single crossovers occur in circular polynucleotides?
Sep
22
accepted How do axon terminals report to the soma?
Jul
24
comment Could we transmit smells electronically?
I guess ultimately you could say the reason is the nature of the sense you're trying to reproduce. While seeing, hearing and touch are all senses based on non-material physical phenomena (sound waves, light rays, forces), the sense of smell serves as a tool to sample gaseous chemicals. This is why it's so intimately connected to taste, which is sampling the chemicals in solid and liquid matter.
Jul
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
26
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
28
awarded  Yearling
Apr
7
comment Why do some people find vegetables so repellent when evolutionarily they should find them an attractive and thus tasty food?
Though in retrospect, I'm not sure anything about attractiveness, i.e. sexual selection, is very relevant to evolution of taste - at the very least considering that overcoming our sense of taste is a pretty easy thing to do in order to increase attractiveness (which is very evident today).