4,836 reputation
1736
bio website youtube.com/user/Arm0ry
location Heidelberg, Germany
age 23
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen 15 hours ago

BSc in Biomedical Science, currently studying towards a PhD in Molecular Systems Biology.

I have several years worth of experience in web development and programming as well as basics of graphic design.

I'm a language nerd and a citizen science geek. I love techy stuff and wish I had the time to fiddle with electronics myself, but to that regard even building my own PC will have to wait for a while now.


Mar
31
revised If life is discovered on another planet, will it likely be classified using the current domain/kingdom/phylum system?
added 640 characters in body
Mar
30
comment If life is discovered on another planet, will it likely be classified using the current domain/kingdom/phylum system?
Valid point, does that sound better? I have to say that this made me realise the question could stir discussion more than encouraging an objective answer, so may be a candidate for closing.
Mar
30
revised If life is discovered on another planet, will it likely be classified using the current domain/kingdom/phylum system?
what's up with my o's and u's tonight
Mar
29
comment DNA gel extraction: chemical contaminants
Agree, you should check the reading before digestion and see what amount of DNA you're working with.
Mar
29
answered If life is discovered on another planet, will it likely be classified using the current domain/kingdom/phylum system?
Mar
29
reviewed Close RACE pcr product
Mar
28
comment Can mammals from different species reproduce?
It's not a "percentage similarity" that's needed - it's a compatibility of the sperm's attachment mechanisms and what attachment sites the ovum provides. If all the fusion machinery is compatible, a viable embryo should be able to form, so strictly it should be possible for the rest of the genome to be entirely different. Although of course the higher the overall similarity, the more likely it is the fusion machinery will be compatible.
Mar
28
reviewed Reviewed what's an ethics-friendly way to measure the protocol of electric shocking mice?
Mar
27
awarded  Custodian
Mar
27
reviewed Reviewed What is a simple protocol for staining cells in suspension?
Mar
27
comment What is a simple protocol for staining cells in suspension?
That's probably part of his question ;)
Mar
25
comment Why do some people find vegetables so repellent when evolutionarily they should find them an attractive and thus tasty food?
While I'm flattered that you accepted my answer already, I would suggest that you leave it open for a bit longer to encourage other people to give their answers. My answer was not a very good answer in the sense that it's only reasoning and not drawing upon any reliable sources :)
Mar
25
comment Why do some people find vegetables so repellent when evolutionarily they should find them an attractive and thus tasty food?
Attractiveness is a cultural value - it wasn't long ago (only a few hundred years) that the ideal figure was actually everything else than slim. Have a look at depictions of beautiful women and men in art throughout the centuries (e.g. in the antique god/esses of beauty, or paintings of literary figures which are supposed to be beautiful). Healthiness also depends on context. As I said, today what we consider healthy are things that sustain a healthy body for a long life. Not long ago, what was healthy were things that sustain life at all.
Mar
25
answered Why do some people find vegetables so repellent when evolutionarily they should find them an attractive and thus tasty food?
Mar
23
answered What controls the breast size?
Mar
20
reviewed Close Specific enzyme for C. elegans
Mar
19
comment Why does sexual selection evolve beautiful features?
In regards to the "beautiful features" part, your Q2, Dan Dennett explains the issue well here: ted.com/talks/dan_dennett_cute_sexy_sweet_funny.html
Mar
19
comment Why does sexual selection evolve beautiful features?
Hey! Welcome to Bio.SE :) This is certainly a good question. However, it requires a very broad explanation of how sexual selection works, so it seems unlikely that you will get a full answer that clears all of this up. It would probably be a good idea to read the Wikipedia article and see if that makes the issue more understandable to you. If you have any more specific question then, pleasea do ask here!
Mar
12
revised Growth kinetics of E.coli on media containing lactose and casein
presentation makes half the impression
Mar
12
awarded  Custodian