4,417 reputation
1734
bio website youtube.com/user/Arm0ry
location London, UK / Stuttgart, Germany
age 23
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Jul 20 at 10:15

Finishing a BSc in Biomedical Science in 2014.

I have several years worth of experience in web development and programming as well as basics of graphic design (meaning that I like toying with inkscape).

I'm a language nerd and a private science geek. I love techy stuff and wish I had the time to fiddle with electronics myself, but to that regard even building my own PC will have to wait for a while now.


Jan
28
revised How reversible is DAT upregulation from long-term ADHD medication use?
DAT stands for dopamine transporter -- they are not receptors, but they are a form of proteins (of which receptors are too), mate. (I'm Aussy)
Jan
24
comment Do single crossovers occur in circular polynucleotides?
Changed the question to reflect this.
Jan
24
revised Do single crossovers occur in circular polynucleotides?
edited title
Jan
22
revised Why do marine animals have fins?
edited title
Jan
21
comment Why have humans evolved conciousness?
Given how we clearly would have no hardship eradicating everything else on earth (though funnily moral objections against doing so), it could be that intelligence/conscience/... is an "absolute advantage" trait similar to, for example, using enzymes rather than ribozymes or DNA in conjunction with RNA - except that we're not yet at the stage where all alternatives are eradicated.
Jan
21
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How does toluene inhalation damage the brain?
Jan
20
answered Which blood vessel carries the most impure blood?
Jan
19
comment Do single crossovers occur in circular polynucleotides?
good idea on topousomerase though! that might be
Jan
19
comment Do single crossovers occur in circular polynucleotides?
thanks for your answer! valid thought, though crossover does occur in prokaryotes frequently - think of plasmids. the phenomenon I'm wondering about is that crossover from plasmids always seems to be doubled, exchanging a fragment between the chromosome and plasmid, and never single :)
Jan
17
comment Where does all the food go?
Yup, faeces is only the matter that wasn't taken up by the digestive system - plus some stuff excreted via bile by the liver.
Jan
17
comment Do neurons secrete multiple neurotransmitters, or just one type?
My knowledge isn't detailed enough for this specifically but as far as I know: each postsynaptic membrane has receptors to one specific neurotransmitter and each terminal only secretes one specific transmitter - which doesn't exclude that other terminals of the same neuron might secrete different transmitters. Once the postsynaptic receptor generates a membrane change from the interaction, it's all just potentials, so a neuron is not limited in number to how many different transmitters it can receive.
Jan
11
answered Why human body cannot defend against HIV?
Jan
10
comment Can a tumor produce something not currently found in our own bodies?
I doubt it - tumours usually originate from differentiated cells where a few growth-restricting genes are turned off by mutations - I'd consider it extremely unlikely for them by chance to mutate and turn on the whole patterns of genes that work in alternation and conjunction to cause correct differentiation and produce tissues other than lumps. But I can't refer to any papers so I might be wrong and hence this is only a comment :)
Jan
9
comment How does prolonged exposure to high frequency noise affect hearing?
Rodent protection modules for car engines give off high-pitched but quiet noises :) In any case, I don't think a high-pitched sound has any different effects of prolonged exposure compared to a low-pitched sound.
Jan
9
comment How does prolonged exposure to high frequency noise affect hearing?
You're asking about high-pitched noises even at low volumes, but your examples are high in volume, not (necessarily) pitch. Which are you actually interested in?
Jan
8
comment How are epigenetic marks transmitted during cell division?
As far as I understand Alberts, after dissociation from DNA at the replication fork, histones will randomly reassociate with the copy and the original, so half of the marked histones will associate with the copy in the region which was just replicated. Then you get HP1 and such propagating the modifications all the way to the ominous "boundary element".
Jan
8
revised Can positive and negative blood type of a couple lead to miscarriage?
added 28 characters in body
Jan
7
accepted What is the purpose of the adrenal medulla?
Jan
7
answered Can positive and negative blood type of a couple lead to miscarriage?
Jan
7
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Can positive and negative blood type of a couple lead to miscarriage?