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1d
comment Specific genetic code sequence
I don't understand this question, or the point of it. You just want any old mRNA sequence between 100 and 1000 bases? Why? NCBI is full of sequences (see @canadianer's link above), why couldn't you just look there?
May
19
comment Coffee efficiency?
That's fine amongst friends, but as a new member of a community you may want to tread more lightly until you're familiar with how things work, and have developed some relationships. I am absolutely not ashamed whatsoever that I'm a scientist, and I often refer to myself as a nerd or geek. However, addressing strangers like that is rather different.
May
19
comment Coffee efficiency?
Hint: When asking for help with something, it's probably best to not insult the people you are asking.
May
18
comment 16S rRNA sequencing
Have you done any research at all? Google would be a great place to start.
May
17
comment Inoculation vs. vaccination
Cowpox (Vaccinia) is not "weakened smallpox" (Variola). They are entirely separate, but related, viruses.
May
17
comment Why do cows (and other hooved animals) need a hierarchy?
Practically all social groups have hierarchies. Why shouldn't cows?
May
16
comment Were we able to create vitamin B12 in past?
Bacteria (and archaea) produce B12, not mammals. Full stop. It is absorbed into the host's body, and passed along when those hosts are consumed by other animals, including humans. The difference between self-production and symbiosis is the point. You claim that herbivores produce B12 by themselves, and that is simply not true, any more than saying humans produce iron because it is found in our hemoglobin is true. Animals have never been B12 producers, because we lack the necessary biochemical pathways.
May
16
comment Were we able to create vitamin B12 in past?
from the very first sentence of the section you link to: "Ultimately, animals must obtain vitamin B12 directly or indirectly from bacteria...". Therefore, herbivores don't produce B12 themselves - it comes from bacteria in their gut. I don't understand what your statement about cows and flies means...
May
16
comment Wearing sunglasses during a solar eclipse
@BrianFunt yes, that is correct.
May
16
comment RF Cautery DNA damage?
@AlBundy interesting that the page you linked to doesn't indicate where the study was published. Anybody can run a study and publish on the internet, citations and all, but unless it's peer-reviewed and approved by a group of independent scientists in the field, it's meaningless.
May
16
comment RF Cautery DNA damage?
Excellent response. I especially like the knife vs. belt sander example :)
May
16
comment How to do pancreatic islets culture?
Have you done any research? There are lots of resources out there. If you have a specific question, please edit your question and narrow it down.
May
16
comment What is a xenobiotic response?
Did you do any research? Seems like there's lots of information out there...
May
16
comment How does CO₂ concentration affect photosynthesis?
Do you have a source for that theory?
May
16
comment Were we able to create vitamin B12 in past?
Can you provide a source for your claim that "all herbivores produce vitamin B12 by themselves"? If that was true, humans would be able to as well, since we consume plenty of vegetables, and some of us are on the vegetarian-vegan spectrum.
May
15
comment Free easy to use Biological Drawing software
@Katz please read through the help center to learn more about this site, and the Stack Exchange model in general. SE runs sites that have clear, high-quality, on-topic questions getting answered by experts in the field, to provide a resource for future visitors. The reason for keeping the quality high is to provide a trusted source of knowledge. Without all the behind-the-scenes cleanup that goes on, the sites would just devolve into Yahoo! Answers. There are plenty of forums online where you can ask lousy questions and get equal-quality answers - we don't want to be one of them.
May
15
comment More about nanobody?
Have you done any other research than just reading that one page?
May
14
comment What is the convention for log notation in biology?
I typically use log10 for doing things like dose-response curves, but something like fold-induction of genes may be better expressed by log2. It would probably be safe to assume log10 if they don't specify, but for your own work you should definitely specify which base you're using. I can't recall ever seeing the natural log (base e) in biological papers, but that may just be my fields of interest, which aren't terribly mathematically-heavy.
May
11
comment Stable and strong promoter?
How about SV40?
May
9
comment Storing Taqman plates with polymerase in fridge before running
@MarchHo the cDNA has been prepared ahead of time and frozen. On the day of the qPCR, I prepare the reaction using 2 dye-labeled probes (gene of interest and internal standard), PCR master mix, template, and H2O. All this is aliquoted into 96-well PCR plates and stored at 4C. When it's time to run the next plate, it's taken out of the fridge, polymerase is added, the plate is put in the thermocycler, and run. What I'm wondering is whether I can add the polymerase when I'm setting up the plates, then just take the next plate out of the fridge, put it in the thermocycler, and run.