2,625 reputation
627
bio website mattdmo.com
location near Boston
age 35
visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen 4 hours ago

Long-time OSS user/admin, intermediate coder - I heart . Master of Science in Molecular Medicine, many years' experience in biotech working with antibodies and cell-based assays. Science and computer geek. Dad.


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Why Pigimal?

I sometimes call my guinea pig (also known as a cavy) "Pigimal", which is short for "Piggy Animal." Now you know.


Flair, Baby!


Apr
9
comment Which disorders are fully concordant?
For those that don't know about it, could you expand a little on what MZ discordance is and what it means for a disease?
Apr
2
comment dopamine paradox in Schizophrenia
I'm no expert, which is why this isn't an answer, but it may have to do with receptor down-regulation, or an altering of receptor signaling.
Apr
1
comment How does mutation work natural population? and is it common in protists or prokaryotes?
What other causes of evolutionary change are you comparing mutations to? If you get right down to it, every change is a mutation of some sort...
Mar
31
comment Cells created using differently aligned proteins
@nico - a few D-amino acids here and there may not affect structure/function too much, I agree. But I really can't imagine that a fully D organism could exist. I didn't get into this in my answer, but I doubt that all tRNAs could bind the D isoforms of their respective payloads. Secondary and tertiary structures often depend on H-bonding, and a change in chirality could destroy those bonds, leading to incorrect folding.
Mar
30
comment building intelligent structure with random evolution requires series of non useful steps
Unfortunately, evolution is not like writing a computer program, which has a very strict syntax, type checking, etc. Please read through the comments and answers to this recent question for a more in-depth discussion. This response in particular addresses the computer analogy. "Advantageous" is a tricky word. There are plenty of instances of DNA changes ("mutations" if you like) that may be negative in the short run, but prove protective otherwise. Sickle-cell anemia is one of those.
Mar
30
comment Can inhibition of lymphocytes migration be a direct cause of chronic inflammation?
I edited your question both to add your image of the slide and to remove your "quote", which was not at all what the slide said. Also, it should be clarified here that cord factor comes from M. tuberculosis.
Mar
30
comment building intelligent structure with random evolution requires series of non useful steps
The key idea you're missing is that evolution is not random. Read up on "selective pressure".
Mar
27
comment Single channel micro arrays
@PlaysDice - please avoid answering questions in comments - see the meta discussion here for more background. Thanks.
Mar
27
comment If a gene altered causes cancer and creates a protein for cancer can the new protein be isolated in some way?
I would take the second paragraph and ask that as a separate question, as there is some interesting work being done now on the chemical signatures of various tumors, and specifically trying to catch them as early as possible via blood tests, and not invasive or semi-invasive procedures like colonoscopies, mammograms, biopsies, etc.
Mar
27
comment If a gene altered causes cancer and creates a protein for cancer can the new protein be isolated in some way?
Your current edit just added several more questions. Please try to focus on one question at a time.
Mar
27
comment If a gene altered causes cancer and creates a protein for cancer can the new protein be isolated in some way?
So are you asking if there is some way of inactivating the cancer proteins in the cell?
Mar
27
comment If a gene altered causes cancer and creates a protein for cancer can the new protein be isolated in some way?
I'm afraid your question is not very clear. What do you mean by isolated? There are many lab techniques scientists use for studying oncogenic ("cancer-causing") proteins, and individual proteins can be "isolated" or separated out from the cellular milieu quite easily by a variety of methods, including separation based on size, pH, hydrophobicity, affinity for other molecules, mobility in an electric field, etc. One can also use specific antibodies or other protein binding partners to bind proteins of interest. Please edit your question and clarify what exactly you're asking about.
Mar
21
comment Transport of mammalian insulin in vivo
Do you mean how does insulin get secreted and absorbed? The insulin gene stays in the DNA in the nucleus, just like all other genes. Have you read the Wikipedia article on insulin? It has a lot of information that should help you understand the pathway. If you have more specific questions, please edit your question and describe them in detail.
Mar
21
comment Can P. falciparum and other malaria parasites be cultured and genetically engineered?
I did a rotation in grad school in a malaria lab, and I seem to recall the PI saying (this was 10 years ago) that you can get a fairly homogenous population by timing when you infect the RBCs with the parasite. This way, they can get the reproducibility they need for multiple experiments.
Mar
19
comment How did the roar evolve from snort?
Snoring involves generating sound while inhaling, and people can speak while inhaling as well.
Mar
18
comment How quickly is antibiotic resistance lost?
Is this a homework question, by any chance?
Mar
17
comment Online Molecular and Cellular Biology Video Lectures?
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes.
Mar
11
comment What makes the amide bond the lowest energy pathway?
This question is probably better suited to Chemistry.SE
Mar
9
comment How is a stem-cell induced to assimilate a knock-in DNA construct?
What is the title of the paper - "Genetically engineered mice with an additional class of cone photoreceptors: Implications for the evolution of color vision"?
Mar
9
comment How is a stem-cell induced to assimilate a knock-in DNA construct?
OK, I understand. Can you post a PubMed link to the paper so I can see what kind of mouse they made?