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Jun
26
comment is left brachiochephalic vein and left pulmonary artery is same?
Veins are not the same as arteries. A non-capillary blood vessel is either one or the other, not both.
Jun
26
comment Why does human hair grow over our eyes
I'm sure late hominids/early humans were intelligent enough to brush their hair back from their faces. Also, what exactly do you mean by "natural humans"? Modern Homo sapiens is just as "natural" as Homo neanderthalensis, Homo erectus, and our other ancestors. Stone Age humans are just as "natural" as 21st century humans.
Jun
26
comment Southern blotting
@Transcriptase you may want to consider posting a link to either an open-access journal or some other website. Not everyone has access to Nature.
Jun
26
comment Immortality Gene? Really?
I looked up the subject of the interview you linked at livescience.com on PubMed, and looked back to about 2010 before giving up. There are 121 citations in that search, and nearly all of them are in Rejuvenation Research, a journal that he just happens to be the editor of. All of the references I looked up were quite obviously editorials, so it looks like this guy is just playing at being a scientist. Maybe he's good at synthesizing current research, but he sure isn't contributing anything original.
Jun
20
comment best book for a comprehensive introduction to biology for a computer science graduate interested in undertaking research in bioinformatics
I concur with biogirl. MBotC was my introduction to molecular biology, and will give you a lot of background information. Of course, it shouldn't be your only resource (you wouldn't read just one book to learn a new programming language, for example), but it's a great place to start.
Jun
19
comment Cell Line With DNMT3a Mutation
All I'm saying is if you can't find a cell line that meets your needs, it would be quite cost-effective to generate one on your own. There are some extra costs outside of the kit, but this Life Technologies kit is only US$514, whereas purchasing a new cell line from ATCC not in your collection may cost an approximately equivalent amount, depending on the line, what kind of institution you're at, etc. Worth thinking about.
Jun
19
comment Cell Line With DNMT3a Mutation
Why not just induce one? There are quite easy-to-use CRISPR/Cas kits available nowadays.
Jun
19
comment Has anyone tried to prepare chemically competent Mycobacteria?
Mycobacteria are very different from E. coli. I would be rather surprised if you could adapt the methods without a lot of customization. What's wrong with electroporation?
Jun
19
comment Quantifying temporal-spatial data
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it would be much better suited at Cross Validated.
Jun
18
comment Is Araucaria fruit toxic?
A very simple Google search should have told you that the seeds are edible.
Jun
17
comment Why don't mosquitoes evolve towards muting themselves?
@TheDarkSide for exactly the same reason as explained in the answer - there is no selection pressure to lower the volume. Additionally, since mosquitoes find each other by sound, lowering the intensity would decrease numbers of mating attempts, something that I'm fairly sure would not be advantageous to the species.
Jun
17
comment How can a ligand be an integral membrane protein?
@NaiveHalmos see my other comment. I think you were getting confused with comments about entirely different things. Just to put it plainly here: EGF is soluble. EGFR is a transmembrane receptor. Plain typical paracrine signaling here, with maybe a bit of autocrine thrown in just for fun in certain cases, like cancer. I don't believe EGF even has a transmembrane domain in its gene sequence, so juxtacrine signaling isn't even possible. Some cytokines and other proteins have both soluble and transmembrane domains, and can be cleaved, so they can signal via both juxtacrine and paracrine means.
Jun
17
comment How can a ligand be an integral membrane protein?
@NaiveHalmos EGF/EGFR do not act via juxtacrine signaling. EGF is soluble, and EGFR is transmembrane. The juxtacrine signaling being referred to by WYSIWYG is the interaction between an immune cell like a T cell and, for example, an activating cell like a dendritic cell.
Jun
16
comment How can a ligand be an integral membrane protein?
@tel I have corrected the Ligand (biochemistry) wikipedia page to remove the emphasis on small molecules.
Jun
16
comment How can a ligand be an integral membrane protein?
@canadianer yes, there are several classes of hormones, including peptide-based (insulin, oxytocin, etc.) and protein hormones like human growth hormone. Perhaps my wording was slightly off, I probably should have said "EGF is not a hormone, it's a protein growth factor."
Jun
16
comment How can a ligand be an integral membrane protein?
@tel I'm on my phone now, but I'll edit the article as soon as I can tomorrow.
Jun
16
comment How can a ligand be an integral membrane protein?
(...) I'm also not sure what you mean by "cell movement and signal propagation may be acting in opposite directions." Cells move one way or another, signaling cascades generally move from receptor to nucleus (to affect gene transcription), or in this case, from receptor to cytoskeleton (to move the cell).
Jun
16
comment How can a ligand be an integral membrane protein?
@user3521072 First, EGF is not a hormone, it's a protein. Second, there's no rule that says that a hormone "has to be secreted [...] and transported [...] to another area". You can very easily grow cells in a 96-well plate and treat them with insulin or estrogen or whatever hormone you feel like. EGF's receptor is EGFR, which is an IMP, to use your abbreviation. I'm not very clear on why you're thinking that its binding partner (here called a receptor, since EGF is the soluble ligand) should be soluble as well - if it was, how would the target cell receive the signal? (...)
Jun
15
comment Why are the organs for reproduction and urinary excretion combined?
Excellent answer, well done!
Jun
15
comment Why are the organs for reproduction and urinary excretion combined?
@sagar "nature" doesn't make mistakes, because there is no conscious thought involved. Evolution produces changes in DNA that accumulate over time and lead to new phenotypes. Those phenotypes either give a reproductive advantage, a disadvantage, or are neutral. These either allow a population to survive/flourish in a particular ecological niche, or not. Generally, traits that negatively impact a population's likelihood of survival are selected against, and tend to disappear over time. Since this combination you are interested in is widely spread across species, it likely confers an advantage.