Reputation
7,626
Top tag
Next privilege 10,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
2 22 45
Newest
 Outspoken
Impact
~230k people reached

May
1
comment What kind of fish are these?
Thanks for the confirmation, you are correct. I accepted the other answer because yours was posted 10 seconds too late - I doubt you'll mind, though :)
May
1
comment iPSC in drug discovery
iPSCs are already a common model in industry, obviously depending on what exactly you're researching. I don't have any citations, because all of the work I'm aware of is proprietary (that comes with working in industry...), but lots of companies and labs are using them right now.
Apr
30
comment If your atlas is out of alignment, will the rest of your spine be out as well?
sciencebasedmedicine.org/the-problem-with-chiropractic-nucca
Apr
30
comment SSR Association Mapping
Please define all non-common acronyms like SSR and GLM (common exceptions include DNA, PCR, etc.). Additionally, this sounds like a software issue, and not necessarily a biology question. Please contact the manufacturer for software technical support, or perhaps check out Biostars.
Apr
29
comment peritoneal dialysis Vs Hemodialysis?
Have you done any research on your own? Just googling the title of your question brings up lots of relevant results.
Apr
29
comment Complementing back the expression of a knockout gene
Your question does not contain enough details to adequately suggest what might be wrong. Is your construct expressing the human protein (and not mouse or something else)? How does its expression compare to the wild-type cell line without the knockout? Have you sequenced the knockout to verify you mutated/deleted only the bases you meant to? How are you transfecting the construct? What backbone is it in? Can you see activity if you transfect 293 or HeLa cells? How are you detecting function? In the same functional assay, do the wild-type cells work? Please edit your post and add details.
Apr
29
comment How do cells grow (ie. gain mass)?
Cells gain mass by taking in nutrients and building cellular components with them - proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, etc. What else would you expect?
Apr
28
comment Why can't proteins make copies of themselves?
Because they have no "blueprint" to work off of. DNA is the "set of directions" used to make new proteins.
Apr
28
comment What makes DNA sequences most different/recognizable from a biological perspective?
That's going to vary from one nucleic acid binding protein to another. Remember, DNA and RNA are not simply sequences of letters, but there can be secondary structure, as well as more basic chemical interactions between adjacent or more distant bases - see RNA hairpins as an example. All of this gives a "shape" to the recognized portion of nucleic acid, which can inform binding capacity just as much as, or potentially even more than primary sequence alone.
Apr
28
comment Could potatoes that have been refrigerated for 142 days still sprout?
This question is probably better suited to Gardening & Landscaping.
Apr
27
comment Wasp ID(in Ohio)?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because without a clear image, exact identification is impossible.
Apr
27
comment Do transcripts always start and end with exons?
@David just as a point of clarification, users are under no obligation whatsoever to explain or "justify" their votes, up or down. The message you are referring to appears to low-rep or casual users of a site, but not to more experienced users, who theoretically understand the voting guidelines. I would also point out, as March Ho did, that lashing out in such a defensive and insulting manner, is neither useful to the overall tone of the site, nor likely to prompt anyone to explain or change their vote. Be nice.
Apr
26
comment Does drinking alcohol having UTI may help to kill the bacteria?
Good answer, but I would get rid of the last paragraph. The concentration of ethanol in urine is never going to be high enough to kill even a small percentage of bacteria present. In the United States, a person is legally drunk if their blood alcohol content (BAC) is between 0.08% and 0.1%, depending on the state. Even assuming that unmetabolized alcohol is concentrated 10-fold, and a person is very drunk with a BAC of 0.3%, 3% EtOH won't kill much of anything, especially if it's in a biofilm, as UTIs are.
Apr
26
comment B-cell antibody production
I'm not sure how "different" got in there, I suspect it may be a translation issue or something similar. I suppose the BCRs are "different" in that they're different individual molecules, perhaps what the OP meant to say. I don't know... :)
Apr
26
comment Why does pETDuet-1 only have one T7 terminator but two T7 promoters?
Could they be thinking that the transcription complex from ORF1 would fall apart when hitting an new transcription complex that is being assembled on promoter/RBS 2?
Apr
25
comment Why does pETDuet-1 only have one T7 terminator but two T7 promoters?
Sounds like the manufacturer could answer these questions much better than we can.
Apr
25
comment B-cell antibody production
Please see my comment above. Statement 2 is true, you just misunderstood the question.
Apr
25
comment B-cell antibody production
The specificity of antibodies is answered below. However, I think the answerer misunderstood the "250000" number. What this actually refers to is the number of copies of the cell's antibody that are on the cell surface - each antibody-producing B cell has approximately 250000 antibody molecules on its surface. Each one of those copies is identical, all recognizing exactly the same epitope.
Apr
25
comment Cell Lines in Cancer Biology
Some of this info is on ATCC's or DSMZ's websites, others you will have to get from papers. What exactly do you mean by "mechanism of action" and "advantages and disadvantages over one another"? Drugs have a mechanism of action, cells don't. The advantages and disadvantages of using one particular cell line over another are completely experiment-dependent, so there's no possible way anyone could foresee what you're doing without your telling us.
Apr
24
comment Why do calluses appear most frequent on ring finger?
Do you have any evidence to show that this is a common occurrence, or is this just your personal experience? Everyone develops calluses differently, if they develop them at all, depending on what they use their hands for on a regular basis.