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tyersome
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What is a downstream target?

For example, in a systems biology analysis, what is a "downstream target" and why are these significant in pathway analyses?

I have looked for answers on Google, DuckDuckGo, Wikipedia, etc. but I have not seen a clear definition that explains what it is.

My guess is:

For downstream targets, these are targets (e.g., a protein) that are affected by upstream targets (e.g., another protein) in some kind of pathway (e.g., some pathway related to cancer). It is called a downstream target because it is used to signify where it is in the pathway (located downwards in the pathway) and that it's being affected by something, as opposed to them affecting something (which would make it upstream target)?

What is a target?

I have looked for answers on Google, DuckDuckGo, Wikipedia, etc. but I have not seen a clear definition that explains what it is.

What is a downstream target?

For example, in a systems biology analysis, what is a "downstream target" and why are these significant in pathway analyses?

I have looked for answers on Google, DuckDuckGo, Wikipedia, etc. but I have not seen a clear definition that explains what it is.

My guess is:

For downstream targets, these are targets (e.g., a protein) that are affected by upstream targets (e.g., another protein) in some kind of pathway (e.g., some pathway related to cancer). It is called a downstream target because it is used to signify where it is in the pathway (located downwards in the pathway) and that it's being affected by something, as opposed to them affecting something (which would make it upstream target)?

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What is a downstream target?

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For example, in a systems biology analysis, what is a "downstream target" and why are these significant in pathway analyses?

I have looked for answers on Google, DuckDuckGo, Wikipedia, etc. but I have not seen a clear definition that explains what it is.

My guess is:

For downstream targets, these are targets (e.g., a protein) that are affected by upstream targets (e.g., another protein) in some kind of pathway (e.g., some pathway related to cancer). It is called a downstream target because it is used to signify where it is in the pathway (located downwards in the pathway) and that it's being affected by something, as opposed to them affecting something (which would make it upstream target)?

For example, in a systems biology analysis, what is a "downstream target" and why are these significant in pathway analyses?

I have looked for answers on Google, DuckDuckGo, Wikipedia, etc. but I have not seen a clear definition that explains what it is.

My guess is:

For downstream targets, these are targets (e.g., a protein) that are affected by upstream targets (e.g., another protein) in some kind of pathway (e.g., some pathway related to cancer). It is called a downstream target because it is used to signify where it is in the pathway (located downwards in the pathway) and that it's being affected by something, as opposed to them affecting something (which would make it upstream target)?

I have looked for answers on Google, DuckDuckGo, Wikipedia, etc. but I have not seen a clear definition that explains what it is.

Rollback to Revision 5
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