minor tweaks
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111

#Overview.

Overview.

#Case studies.

Case studies.

##Animals.

Animals.

Kylstra, the first pioneer introducing the idea of land animals breathing liquids (Kylstra et al., 1962), found mice could withstand 4 hours of 160 atmospheres of pressure.

##Humans.

Humans.

Marked improvement in lung compliance, without a compromise of cardiovascular status was was noted in all three patients.

##Biomedical application.

Biomedical application.

#Real world potential.

Real world potential.

So this is where we stand with the case studies; Micemice can breath liquids indefinitely and stay in good health, rabbits with ARDS survive where breathable gas would not help, and there is a contingency in the biomedical community that it can be better than gas ventilation for medical treatment. To me it seems that there is nothing to suggest a fully grown adult would suffer from breathing liquids. The inertness of the fluorocarbons implies any toxicity would only reveal itself in a timescale of years, and everything else about the compounds pose no danger and may make gas transfer across the lungs easier.

#Overview.

#Case studies.

##Animals.

Kylstra, the first pioneer introducing the idea of land animals breathing liquids (Kylstra et al., 1962, found mice could withstand 4 hours of 160 atmospheres of pressure.

##Humans.

Marked improvement in lung compliance, without a compromise of cardiovascular status was noted in all three patients.

##Biomedical application.

#Real world potential.

So this is where we stand with the case studies; Mice can breath liquids indefinitely and stay in good health, rabbits with ARDS survive where breathable gas would not help, and there is a contingency in the biomedical community that it can be better than gas ventilation for medical treatment. To me it seems that there is nothing to suggest a fully grown adult would suffer from breathing liquids. The inertness of the fluorocarbons implies any toxicity would only reveal itself in a timescale of years, and everything else about the compounds pose no danger and may make gas transfer across the lungs easier.

Overview.

Case studies.

Animals.

Kylstra, the first pioneer introducing the idea of land animals breathing liquids (Kylstra et al., 1962), found mice could withstand 4 hours of 160 atmospheres of pressure.

Humans.

Marked improvement in lung compliance, without a compromise of cardiovascular status was noted in all three patients.

Biomedical application.

Real world potential.

So this is where we stand with the case studies; mice can breath liquids indefinitely and stay in good health, rabbits with ARDS survive where breathable gas would not help, and there is a contingency in the biomedical community that it can be better than gas ventilation for medical treatment. To me it seems that there is nothing to suggest a fully grown adult would suffer from breathing liquids. The inertness of the fluorocarbons implies any toxicity would only reveal itself in a timescale of years, and everything else about the compounds pose no danger and may make gas transfer across the lungs easier.

added 5 characters in body; added 12 characters in body
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111

The overall answer The overall answer to the hypothetical question is rather surprising. There may be actually potential benefits to perpetual liquid ventilation for people with diseasecertain diseases. Trials so far have not found side effects in fluorocarbon liquid breathing.

###Animals##Animals.

###Humans##Humans.

###Biomedical##Biomedical application.

Is perpetual liquid breathing possible? ...And healthy?

Is perpetual liquid breathing possible? ...And healthy?

On a lighter note, here is a YouTube video of what Maddie is what Maddie, a biology podcaster from the BBC, had to say on the matter of living in total submersion. Lots of skin problems, risk of infection after a few days etc.

The overall answer to the hypothetical question is rather surprising. There may be actually potential benefits to perpetual liquid ventilation for people with disease. Trials so far have not found side effects in fluorocarbon liquid breathing.

###Animals.

###Humans.

###Biomedical application.

Is perpetual liquid breathing possible? ...And healthy?

On a lighter note, here is what Maddie, a biology podcaster from the BBC, had to say on the matter of living in total submersion. Lots of skin problems, risk of infection after a few days etc.

The overall answer to the hypothetical question is rather surprising. There may be actually potential benefits to perpetual liquid ventilation for people with certain diseases. Trials so far have not found side effects in fluorocarbon liquid breathing.

##Animals.

##Humans.

##Biomedical application.

Is perpetual liquid breathing possible? ...And healthy?

On a lighter note, here is a YouTube video of what Maddie, a biology podcaster from the BBC, had to say on the matter of living in total submersion. Lots of skin problems, risk of infection after a few days etc.

added 1 character in body
Source Link
WYSIWYG
  • 34.9k
  • 9
  • 62
  • 152

@MCM pointed out in the comments that my original answer did no emphasise that animal diaphragms are not powerful enough to move the liquid in and out of the lungs. I should mention now that the below cases all use ventilators to pump the fluid into and out of the lungs. The difficulty of breathing this without a ventilator is emphasised by David Blaine at 4:54 in this TED talk who said it was like trying to breathbreathe with an elephant standing on your chest.

@MCM pointed out in the comments that my original answer did no emphasise that animal diaphragms are not powerful enough to move the liquid in and out of the lungs. I should mention now that the below cases all use ventilators to pump the fluid into and out of the lungs. The difficulty of breathing this without a ventilator is emphasised by David Blaine at 4:54 in this TED talk who said it was like trying to breath with an elephant standing on your chest.

@MCM pointed out in the comments that my original answer did no emphasise that animal diaphragms are not powerful enough to move the liquid in and out of the lungs. I should mention now that the below cases all use ventilators to pump the fluid into and out of the lungs. The difficulty of breathing this without a ventilator is emphasised by David Blaine at 4:54 in this TED talk who said it was like trying to breathe with an elephant standing on your chest.

added 255 characters in body
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading
deleted 47 characters in body
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading
added 12 characters in body
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading
added 165 characters in body
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading
added 59 characters in body
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading
removed gratuitous "good question"
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading
deleted 8 characters in body
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading
Format changes, integrated pump emphasis
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading
no need to gender, the important thing is ADULT.
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading
spelling
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading
added TLDR in introduction
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading
added 39 characters in body
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading
Source Link
James
  • 11.2k
  • 8
  • 55
  • 111
Loading