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AliceD
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Before birth, in the bone marrow millions of different B-cells formare formed. These havecells are differentiated and haveexpress different antibodies.

Are these the only B-cell types you will ever have?

Can Or can the body formulategenerate new types of B-cells cells, with new antibodies to deal with a 'never-before-incountered' threat?

In short can the body form new (uncoded for, not initially-there) antibodiesnewly encountered threats?

Before birth, in the bone marrow millions of different B-cells form. These have differentiated and have different antibodies.

Are these the only B-cell types you will ever have?

Can the body formulate new types of B-cells, with new antibodies to deal with a 'never-before-incountered' threat?

In short can the body form new (uncoded for, not initially-there) antibodies?

Before birth, in the bone marrow millions of different B-cells are formed. These cells are differentiated and express different antibodies.

Are these the only B-cell types you will ever have? Or can the body generate new types of B cells, with new antibodies to deal with newly encountered threats?

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Mirte
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Does an organism have only certain antibodies for life?

Before birth, in the bone marrow millions of different B-cells form. These have differentiated and have different antibodies.

Are these the only B-cell types you will ever have?

Can the body formulate new types of B-cells, with new antibodies to deal with a 'never-before-incountered' threat?

In short can the body form new (uncoded for, not initially-there) antibodies?