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Is it more proportional to the mass or the volume of the plant? I thought it might be helpful to think on the cellular level here. Even a reference to an external explanation would be useful.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! Unfortunately, I'm having some difficulty understanding the context of your question. Can you please elaborate on the background of this question and why the standard description of carbon capture hasn't solved this problem for you? $\endgroup$
    – jakebeal
    Apr 10, 2021 at 20:36
  • $\begingroup$ I guess I'd loved a unified explanation on the level of cell biology. I mean I've phrased the question in what I thought was a pretty good way. Why can't I find it? Even a link to your favorite technical resource would be lovely. Search engine optimization is not doing it for me $\endgroup$ Apr 11, 2021 at 5:24
  • $\begingroup$ The effective carbon capture of a plant involves not just the plant itself but the system that it is part of. Perhaps start by reading up on carbon farming and see if what you find either answers the question behind your question or else allows you to refine it to be more answerable? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_farming $\endgroup$
    – jakebeal
    Apr 11, 2021 at 9:57

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Welcome to Biology.SE! I am not entirely sure what your are asking but here are some places you might want to start:

Photosynthesis Molecular Biology

If you want to know about the number of sugar molecules created 'per photon' by photosynthesis you can explore the light-dependent and light-independent reactions used in photosynthesis. In particular you might want to look at the Calvin Cycle and how NADPH is used there and how NADP is reduced to NADPH in the light-dependent reactions.

Carbon Capture Efficiency

You might be interested in the variation between plants in carbon capture efficiency, i.e. not all plants are equally 'good' at photosynthesis. To think about this you might want to look at different photosynthesis mechanisms (C3 vs C4 and CAM; different forms or amounts of Rubisco enzyme) or you might want to look at sunlight 'capture' mechanisms (photosystem I and II and the accessory pigments like chlorophyll and carotenoids) or even at adaptations to different light environments (trichomes, leaf shape, etc).

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