1
$\begingroup$

Can anyone identify this bird - located in Massachusettsenter image description here

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE. For identification questions please include an estimate of the size, what part of Massachusetts, and include any behavioral, habitat (e.g. types of plants), or other details that you noticed. In addition, if possible clearer pictures from multiple angles would be very helpful. Please edit your post to include as much of that information as possible. Also, what do you mean by "didn't fledge happily"? ——— Please also take the tour and go through the help center starting with How to Ask questions effectively on this site. Thanks. $\endgroup$
    – tyersome
    Jul 2 at 22:45
0
$\begingroup$

It is difficult to be sure without clearer pictures, but my best guess would be a female (and/or immature) Brown-headed cowbird.

This is based on the heavy conical beak, my guess at the size, the overall grey-brown coloration, dark eye, dark beak, dark legs, and the faint suggestion of a line behind the eye. In addition, this is a common species in many parts of Massachusetts.

If you have seen these cowbirds (the males are quite distinctive) in your area that would support this idea.

female brown-headed cow bird Public domain image from USGS.

$\endgroup$
3
  • $\begingroup$ Cowbirds do not raise their own young, they lay their eggs in other birds nests . The cowbird young are generally larger then and push out the original young. It could be the adoptive parents have abandoned this one as it seems big enough to be on its own . $\endgroup$ Jul 2 at 23:56
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, does that have something to do with my answer? $\endgroup$
    – tyersome
    Jul 3 at 4:41
  • $\begingroup$ Looks like a young Cowbird to me, for the same reasons that tyersome gave. Young Cowbirds, like young Starlings, are pretty bland and unmarked. The short neck and big round head also point in that direction. $\endgroup$ Aug 9 at 21:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.