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This was eating my mustard spinach (Brassica rapa subsp. nipposinica) plant in Washington state, USA; about 1cm in length. green caterpillar

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    $\begingroup$ That's a really beautiful photo! Can I ask how you got it on such a pure white background and yet the hairs show up so nicely? $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Jul 25, 2021 at 1:35
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    $\begingroup$ @uhoh Thanks! I spent quite a lot of time editing the image: used various masks to select non-green and almost white things and make them white. $\endgroup$ Jul 25, 2021 at 2:31
  • $\begingroup$ I don’t know the exact species but he is a type of inchworm. $\endgroup$
    – SolarLunix
    Jul 30, 2021 at 5:58
  • $\begingroup$ I was going to say Pieris (cabbage white), but those aren't "inchworms". $\endgroup$
    – bob1
    Jul 30, 2021 at 23:37

2 Answers 2

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I went to images.bing.com and typed Brassica pest lepidoptera, which led immediately to photos of the cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni)

I thought this image was particularly persuasive.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nicely done, I don't know how I missed it. $\endgroup$
    – bob1
    Aug 1, 2021 at 9:39
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Found it using the terms "inchworm species washington" in google.

It is the Winter Moth (Operophtera brumata). This is a common species of invasive pest in the USA and Canada, introduced from Europe. It is an "inchworm" or "looper" as they are known colloquially. The caterpillars have yellowish rings on the body at the segments and longitudinal white stripes.

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    $\begingroup$ I don't think this is Operophtera brumata. The host plant is different, the time of year is different, coloration/marks are different. $\endgroup$ Jul 31, 2021 at 0:19
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    $\begingroup$ @SergiiDymchenko - I agree; see Mike Serfas's answer, looks like the right one. $\endgroup$
    – bob1
    Aug 1, 2021 at 9:40

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