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When we catch a cold, influenza, or Covid-19, the body starts to produce antibody against them, So the body become immune for a period of time. That means one should not get them until the presence of immunity. Become vaccinated in this period of time seems to be useless. Imagine someone caught Covid-19 one month ago, should they get vaccinated later?

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    $\begingroup$ I don't think the question is suitable under the community rules. Having said that - indeed, in most affected countries vaccination is recommended only a few months after teh recovery from COVID-19. Moreover, as teh sanitary measures go, the certificate of recovery from COVID-19 is usually accepted as an equivalent of the vaccination certificate. $\endgroup$ Sep 9, 2021 at 7:13
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    $\begingroup$ The level of immunity produced by a given infection in a given person can vary widely. Vaccinating shortly after one has had the disease can indeed boost the body's immune response even further; in fact, studies in Britain earlier this year demonstrated a strong increase in antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 after previously-infected people were given a dose of Pfizer vaccine (doi.org/10.1126/science.abh1282 )\ $\endgroup$
    – Armand
    Sep 9, 2021 at 7:49

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Yes. Studies on reinfections consistently show that a booster vaccination after an infection further reduces the risk of contracting COVID-19 a second time. The recommended time interval is 6 month after the infection.

A vaccination also can reduce the symptoms of Long Covid although the mechanism of this effect is not yet known.

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    $\begingroup$ To which studies do you refer? $\endgroup$
    – canadianer
    Sep 9, 2021 at 15:10

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