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It appears that the best time to attack a wasp nest is in the middle of the night. Their venom might terrorize us (my five-day old sting remains swollen and is starting to have red bumps in an area the size of a tennis ball), but at least our eyesight is superior. If we attack while they are asleep, or at least resting, we have our best chance of escaping unscathed—or so the online pundits claim.

The nest in question is at the edge between the wall and the roof protrusion. Because it is 8 feet off the ground rather than on the ground, it would appear to be a paper wasp nest. But because it is covered with paper and the individual cells are occluded, with the entrance at the bottom the only visible path leading inside, it may well be a yellow jacket nest.

Maybe it's futile to attack the nest in September. One might as well let them be. The nest will anyway be deserted in October when the temperature starts to freeze overnight. But it's never too early to prepare for next Spring.

I could choose a night when there is absolutely no light—not even moonlight—but then I myself would need to use a flashlight, providing them with the means of pursuing me. Or I could choose a full-moon, or near full-moon, night, and then I can see and they can, perhaps, not see.

Can wasps see under moonlight?

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    $\begingroup$ The false assumption here is that all animals are as dependent on vision as humans. Insects, in particular, make great use of chemical senses. The reason people say attack at night is not so they can't target you. It's to get as many of them as possible on the first strike so they have fewer to retaliate with. $\endgroup$
    – DKNguyen
    Sep 16 '21 at 16:39
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    $\begingroup$ From my experience in the field, they are pretty adept at flying around in pitch black abandoned farmhouses. $\endgroup$
    – user438383
    Sep 16 '21 at 16:42
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No.... probably not... wasp cannot see at night... their scotopic vision{dim light vision} is not well develop so before sunset they return back to thier nest... so at night.. probably you can get them all together... rather then hunting for each indivisually...for reference https://sciencing.com/how-to-identify-wasps-bees-13406632.html hope it helps..

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome! Thanks for providing an answer. Whilst the information may be correct, we prefer answers to have some kind of citation or reference to back up statements made. If you could add something like that, it would be great. Thanks. $\endgroup$
    – user438383
    Sep 16 '21 at 19:17

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