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Found this spider in my bathroom in central London,UK. I’m convinced it’s tropical. I’m probably wrong. My kids are very curious. Many thanks!enter image description hereenter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! Please edit your post to include an estimate of the size of the organism and if possible photos from different angles (e.g. from the side, front, back, and below) — this will improve your chances of getting a good answer. ——— Please also take the tour and then go through the help center pages starting with How to Ask questions effectively on this site. $\endgroup$
    – tyersome
    Nov 9 '21 at 18:37
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    $\begingroup$ Can you name this spider? -- how about Kevin? ;-) $\endgroup$
    – acvill
    Nov 9 '21 at 21:40
  • $\begingroup$ here is a famous one youtube.com/… $\endgroup$ Nov 10 '21 at 6:46
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This is a false wolf spider called Zoropsis spinimana:

It is found all over Europe, including the London,UK area:

A photo gallery and distribution map of user-submitted observations of Zoropsis spinimana can be found here:

https://inaturalist.org/taxa/127112-Zoropsis-spinimana

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Without a sense of how big this spider exactly, but based on the width of the grouting, I'm guessing body length of about 15-18 mm (0.59 - 0.71 in). This, along with the colouration and long palps would most likely make it Eratigena atrica also known as the Giant House Spider.

This species is widespread in Europe and parts of North America, so not of tropical origin. They are harmless to humans and like to live in cool dark environments, such as under houses, in caves etc.

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  • $\begingroup$ This is NOT Eratigena: the carapace markings are not Eratigena, the leg markings are not Eratigena, no visible spinerrets, the abdominal markings are not Eratigena, the eye arragement is not Agelenid. $\endgroup$
    – JimN
    Nov 10 '21 at 5:44
  • $\begingroup$ @JimN Thanks. I have almost no knowledge of spiders at all, so I welcome your comment and answer. Wolf spider was my second guess, but the dimensions I could find were all much smaller than I could estimate. $\endgroup$
    – bob1
    Nov 10 '21 at 7:13

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