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First of all, I'm not a biology student or have sufficient knowledge of biology so I apologize if this question appears silly. Let's say patient A has cancer cells and a healthy person B has the same blood type as patient A, by using a blood regulator device to regulate the blood between A and B, will the white cell in patient B recognize the normal cell in patient A as foreign cell and attack it? Is there a chance the white cells of person B recognize the cancer cell in patient A as a foreign cell and attack it?

So far what I understand as below from internet

At early stage white blood will detect cancer cell but as the cell evolve, the white blood cell will no longer recognize the cancer cell as foreigner cell which enter the escaping phase, in this phase the cancer cell start to growth without obstruction. However, I am not able to find article like the membrance wall constitution for different people so logically if it is similar, the white cell will not recognize normal cell in both people as a foreigner cell, correct me if i'm wrong but a cancer cell that enter the escaping phase may not treated as normal cell in person B due to difference membrance wall constitution? If this is true, then can this method use to save patient with cancer especially for family members that willing to use a blood regulator device to constantly regulate the blood between both hence regulate the white blood cell of person B into A to fight cancer cell? If this work, this can also use to save patient with Covid at critical stage where an immune person can regulate the blood between both people as if lending the person immunity system to fight covid infected person?

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to the site. What research have you done on your own to answer this question? The Biology.SE community has agreed that questions that show little or no prior research effort are off-topic on this site unless you have shown your attempt at an answer. Please edit your question and tell us where you've looked for answers, what you do know about the topic, and where exactly you still have questions. Our goal is not simply to be an answer site, but rather a site that promotes self-learning with some expert help along the way. $\endgroup$
    – MattDMo
    Nov 13, 2021 at 22:28

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White blood cells have antibodies that target specific proteins on the surface of different cells- this is why blood transfusions need to occur with the same blood type in each patient. (If this were to happen, your body would produce antibodies to attack the foreign blood cells.) To address your first question, as long as the blood types are the same, the cells inside of patient B's blood will not attack any of patient A's blood. Even if patient B had a different blood type as A, if his blood was introduced into A's bloodstream, a healthy amount of B lymphocytes (these are cells that stem from bone marrow and differentiate to create new antibodies) would need to be introduced along with it. Otherwise, the cells would not have the capability to create antibodies that are compatible with A's blood. However, doing this wouldn't really be a good idea, as this would cause an indiscriminate attack- all of A's blood cells would be attacked. And to answer your second question- after cancer cells get past a certain stage in their development, they lose important proteins that the body uses to identify them. In other words, they sneak past its immune system and begin to spread. The escape phase is a direct result of this- the tumor begins to metastasize throughout the body and the body fails to stop it. To be frank, there is very little to do here- the issues with the blood transfusion method are detailed above. And to address your final statement about Covid- from what I understand, this is mostly correct. If you may remember, people with antibodies often donate their plasma to be used in other patients. However, the key part of this is that the blood cells are not the useful part of this transfusion. The antibodies are. It isn't a matter of blood transfusion- it's a matter of antibody transfer. For the most part, however, your logic is correct. I could help you a little more if you linked the websites that you researched. Thanks.

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    $\begingroup$ Would you edit this answer so it's not a wall of text that breaks people's eyeballs, also, adding references to support your claims. Please take our tour and refer to the help center for guidance as to our ways. Welcome to Biology. $\endgroup$ Nov 16, 2021 at 20:44
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    $\begingroup$ news.cancerresearchuk.org/2019/02/28/… this is the article I refer to but that is from the perspective of immune system A couldn't recognize the cancer cell. If the same cancer cell that enter escape phase in A put into healthy person B,C,D and so on, there a 100% chance it escape the immune system of all these healthy people? $\endgroup$
    – chuackt
    Nov 16, 2021 at 21:49

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