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When bacteria insert a part of invading virus DNA into its own genetic sequence, on the 2nd invasion does it duplicate that copied DNA again from wherever the bacteria placed it and put it into a Cas9 protein to search for the invading virus.

  1. Virus invades bacteria.

  2. Bacteria copies portion of virus DNA into its own genetic makeup. (Gains immunity)

  3. Virus attacks attack a further point in time down the line.

  4. So does the bacteria then copy that portion of bacteria that it had copied in the past to put into the Cas9 protein? Or does it temporarily remove the virus DNA to go fight off the virus again, to later reinsert the virus DNA back into its own genome?

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    – Community Bot
    Jan 8 at 22:47

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So does the bacteria then copy that portion of bacteria that it had copied in the past to put into the Cas9 protein?

The DNA is not copied, but rather transcribed. The captured piece of viral DNA (called a spacer) is transcribed into a guide RNA that is incorporated into the Cas9 protein to make an active Cas9 complex.

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