3
$\begingroup$

Are there any biometrics that can estimate how tired someone is? I specifically refer to tiredness in the sense of sleepiness (as opposed to physical tiredness that might happen after a workout, for example).

For context, I'm trying to quantify "tiredness" through methods other than counting hours slept, and I'd like to explore some other way(s) of measuring (approximately or otherwise) how someone is. Also, regarding granularity/accuracy it's okay if a metric can't accurately detect a sudden slump (as may happen after a heavy meal), that would still be of interest (more accurate/granular is better, obviously, but not vital).

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I would pretty much guarantee that artificial intelligence and a learning algorithm of eye movement And Iris dilation would be able to tell when the eyes are alert and when they are lethargic. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 19, 2022 at 19:47

2 Answers 2

5
$\begingroup$

Most of the sleep-deprivation studies I've seen measure cognitive impairment as a way of quantifying sleepiness, similar to some of the metrics taken in drug and alcohol intoxication studies.

Here's a recent proof-of-concept study using a phone app designed to measure things like simple attention, arithmetic ability, episodic memory, working memory, and executive functions like cognitive conflict and behavioral adjustment (using something called a Stroop test). They also included a subjective "sleepiness" survey self-reported by participants on a 1-10 scale.

It's a Frontiers journal, so I would take the results with a grain of salt, but the methods seem well defined to me (a non-expert), which is more than I can say for many of the Frontiers articles in my field of Microbiology. Seems to me like it would be prudent to include some control metric that isn't expected to fluctuate with sleep-deprivation, but, not being an expert in the cognitive science, I'm not sure what that would be.

Reference:

Holding BC, Ingre M, Petrovic P, Sundelin T, Axelsson J. Quantifying Cognitive Impairment After Sleep Deprivation at Different Times of Day: A Proof of Concept Using Ultra-Short Smartphone-Based Tests. Front Behav Neurosci. 2021 Apr 13;15:666146. doi: 10.3389/fnbeh.2021.666146. PMID: 33927603; PMCID: PMC8076531.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Lactate production is a direct measurement of fatigue, also described as tiredness. You may want to consider ATP Synthase production and the results as they relate to temperature and oxygen.

$\endgroup$
3
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ lactate can measure muscle fatigue it is basically useless for mental fatigue. $\endgroup$
    – John
    Commented Jan 15, 2022 at 18:11
  • $\begingroup$ Mental fatigue happens because muscle fatigue happens. That’s how we measure an athletes performance, you need a brain in order to contemplate. $\endgroup$
    – Dbw White
    Commented Jan 16, 2022 at 3:11
  • $\begingroup$ mental fatigue has little to do with muscle fatigue. $\endgroup$
    – John
    Commented Jan 16, 2022 at 4:46

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .