0
$\begingroup$

Is it possible to study expression of human SRY gene from person DNA blood tests? Not just to see if this person has/hasn't got the SRY gene, but also to see if this person has a functional SRY gene, which was expressed during embryo development, because only an expressed SRY gene will result in developing male reproductive anatomy (male sex). In the past, I was told that it is possible, but I need to confirm this. If it is correct, can you please describe these type of tests (for example cell-free DNA blood test of unborn child) and how they work.

Also it is true that the woman described in this study (see below) has a functional SRY gene, which was expressed during embryo development (not just unexpressed SRY gene), despite the fact that she is fertile, has working ovaries and gave birth to the child. If it is true, how many similar cases are known to exist worldwide (or is she only known existing case so far) and how it is possible.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2190741/

$\endgroup$
15
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ How do you imagine analysis for a protein performed on tissues of an adult could establish whether the protein had been expressed during embryo development? And how can anyone without access to the patient described in the study vouch for its veracity? $\endgroup$
    – David
    Jun 22 at 10:05
  • $\begingroup$ I am not geneticist, but it was told to me by other geneticist, that we can determine biological sex of unborn child by taking blood sample and performing so called "cell free blood test" (with close of 100% accuracy). I can not post link, because it was on non-english forum, which no longer exists. This "cell free blood test" should show not only if unborn child has XX, XY chromosomes, but also if it has functional SRY gene, which was expressed during embryo devolepment. Can you describe this "cell free blood test" of unborn child and can be some similar tests performed also 1/2 $\endgroup$
    – MutantX12
    Jun 22 at 16:17
  • $\begingroup$ in adult person. It was told to me that yes. As for fertile woman in the linked study above. It was told to me that this women has functional SRY gene, which was expressed during embryo development, despite the fact that she has working ovaries and gave birth to the child. I by myself doubt, if it was correct information and if person with XY chromosomes and expressed SRY gene can develop working female reproductive anatomy, so I wanted to confirm this. Just dont forget describe how "cell free blood test" works and how we can study gene expression of unborn child or adult person. 2/2 $\endgroup$
    – MutantX12
    Jun 22 at 16:17
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ You haven't answered my question. Perhaps I misunderstood yours, but if so you didn't point this out. One aspect of posting questions on this site is that we expect you to do some research yourself on a problem. The basic question of whether it is possible to detect the product of the SRY gene can quickly be found from an internet search. Yes, there are antibody kits. But this can only tell whether the protein is present in the sample. You seem to be asking whether there is a test in the adult that would indicate whether it was expressed in the embryo. That seems impossible. $\endgroup$
    – David
    Jun 22 at 17:30
  • $\begingroup$ I tried to google this and it is definitely not easy to be answered from simple internet search. Are you saying that we can study SRY gene expression ( or as you wrote " to detect the product of SRY gene " ) only during embryo development in first 8 weeks of pregnancy ? And only by using as you wrote " antibody kits " ? Is there any other way how to study expression of SRY gene after first 8 weeks of pregnancy ? And in born child or adult person ? And last question, can person with expressed SRY gene really develop working female reproductive anatomy as woman mentioned in the study above ? $\endgroup$
    – MutantX12
    Jun 22 at 17:58

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.