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I mean as in, you could zoom all way in from the 3D view of the body, to the eye, to the retina, to individual cone cells, to the nucleus, to the DNA all the way to the atoms that compose it. And it would work across all the body, in a procedural-like fashion. Is there anything like that? If so, why not? The technology is there.

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    $\begingroup$ Why do you think that the limiting factor would be in "procedurally generating arbitrary-precision structures"? There are tens of trillions of cells in a human body, so "obviously knowing where each cell is" can be more than trivial. So can knowing where tens of millions of proteins (of 10s of thousands of types) are in each cell. After that, knowing the linear arrangement of atoms in a chemical diagram in a cell is actually a pretty easy step, but figuring out how even one protein folds is not. $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    2 days ago
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    $\begingroup$ Now, I don't doubt people have made animated/diagram versions of the sort of thing you're proposing, but these have the accuracy of a textbook illustration and are largely an artist's rendition. $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    2 days ago
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    $\begingroup$ @BryanKrause perhaps I expressed myself poorly, but I don't mean that it would magically fold proteins in real time or know where every single atom is. It would be an approximation which tracks our current state of knowledge. Having trillions of cells isn't a problem computationally. So, if we don't know the structure of a particular cell in the body, fine, it is just a part where we can't zoom in. But we already know a lot, so it would be really handy to have it presented as a 3D tool where we can deeply zoom in anywhere, which is why I asked the question. $\endgroup$
    – MaiaVictor
    2 days ago
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not going to go through piece by piece what biologists do and don't know in the comments and argue about whether this is a reasonable thing to expect or not. $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    yesterday
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    $\begingroup$ We don't have the knowledge to do this across the body. Period. We also know the atomic composition of most organelles No, we don't. Knowing the atomic composition means knowing the protein composition, and that only isn't completely known, it changes based on the state of the cell and many, many other things. We aren't even close to knowing all protein-protein interactions. Having trillions of cells isn't a problem computationally. Umm, yes it is. When was the last time you had to compute 50 trillion data points? And that's assuming that each cell is a single data point, which it's not. $\endgroup$
    – MattDMo
    yesterday

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