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As winter approaches and the amount of sunlight decreases in the northern hemisphere, I have been reading about red light therapy and its supposed beneficial clinical effects.

Yet there is no much explanation for how red light impacts the metabolism and inflammation related to the mitochondria, which is the supposed benefit of this therapy. Is there any in depth explanation of the impact in the molecular machinery in the body? Does red light impacts/effects change when red light is exposed to different cells/organs?

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    $\begingroup$ We ask questions to demonstrate prior research. An example in this case might be to show evidence that red light therapy is effective for something, such that it's appropriate to ask a follow up question about the mechanism. $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    Oct 10, 2022 at 23:00
  • $\begingroup$ The claim is that red light therapy decreases inflammation and increases ATP production; my question is the pathway that allows this + the supplementary question. $\endgroup$ Oct 10, 2022 at 23:19
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    $\begingroup$ Okay, but whose claim? What is the source? Demonstrate the research you've done so far. $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    Oct 10, 2022 at 23:33

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Sorry for entering the conversation from the side. I am a little interested in the topic and found this paper.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4126803/

This paper explains here;

The photons are absorbed by mitochondrial chromophores in skin cells. Consequently electron transport, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) nitric oxide release, blood flow, reactive oxygen species increase and diverse signaling pathways get activated.

As my thought, Mitochondria were independent bacteria until they were incorporated into cells, so I don't think it is strange that their activity is activated in response to light. I believe that the mitochondria had chromophores that absorb red light well out of the wavelengths of light.

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