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I know that trisomia of chromosome 21 gives a person the Down's syndrome. Sometimes one can have sex-chromosome trisomia, and it is not apparent until adolescence. Certainly none of those problems kills its victim.

In theory, somebody could have both these trisomias at once, meaning they would have 48 chromosomes - 21 pairs and two triplets.

But some trisomias can be deadly (e.g. in chromosome 13 - Patau syndrome, often results in stillbirth).

So how many extra chromosomes could a human theoretically have, without dying? I mean the total number of them.

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    $\begingroup$ It's not clear what you're asking. Clearly you understand that even 1 extra chromosome can be fatal, though for some it is survivable. Are you asking if there are survivable quadsomies? If there are survivable trisomies besides 21 or X/Y combinations? What's the value of this question besides trivia? $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    Oct 31, 2022 at 19:45
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    $\begingroup$ What does "the total number of them" mean? $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    Nov 2, 2022 at 18:51

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Well there exists a condition called tetraploidy which you may have figured out means 4 sets of chromosomes in a cell. XXXX in females and XXYY in males and that's 92 chromosomes life expectancy is about an year

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    $\begingroup$ You need to verify your answer with a source (a reliable one). The vast majority of humans with true tetraploidy die in utero or shortly after birth. Survivors are usually mosaics. There are exceptions, but they are rare indeed. $\endgroup$ Oct 31, 2022 at 0:52

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