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I was walking in the grass near the Trinity Trail in Fort Worth, Texas about two weeks ago, and saw these tiny purple streaks flitting about at mid-calf level that turned out to be butterflies. I followed and tried to get lots of pictures, but the butterflies were quite fast and tiny, and I only got one decent close-up.

Blue/purple butterfly overwings

Its wings were a dull brown/gray colour when closed, but I couldn't get any better pictures than this grainy one.

Dull folded wings

Because of how fast it was moving, I couldn't really estimate size reliably, but it was probably slightly wider than the width of my thumbnail when its wings were open. With its wings closed, the height of the butterfly was about the longest height of my thumbnail. These are very rough estimates.

It looked quite a bit like the linked picture of a purple moonbeam—one of Google Lens's suggestions—but those seem to be Australian butterflies.

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    $\begingroup$ No, not much size variation. Try LYCAENIDAE (gray wings belong to this family as well.) There are smaller ones (called "blues") very similar to gray hairstreaks, e.g.the Echo Blue. Hard to find the distribution, though, but definitely Southern N.A. $\endgroup$ Commented Nov 23, 2022 at 17:27
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    $\begingroup$ @anongoodnurse, thanks! Google Lens also turned up Echo Blue as a suggestion, but, as you say, I couldn't find information about their geographic distribution, or even a picture like you offer. The size seems right, so it could be! Searching also turned up the Melissa Blue, whose overwings look just right, but not the underwings. $\endgroup$
    – LSpice
    Commented Nov 23, 2022 at 17:31
  • $\begingroup$ @anongoodnurse, re, I think enough time has passed to regard that as the most definitive answer I'll get. If you would be willing to post it as an answer, then I will accept it. $\endgroup$
    – LSpice
    Commented Jul 21, 2023 at 3:25
  • $\begingroup$ What an odd coincidence: I thought of you today when I saw this video, wondering if it was your Melissa Blue. Thanks for the offer, but I'm disinclined to post a guess as an answer. I hope you understand. :) $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 21, 2023 at 8:09
  • $\begingroup$ @anongoodnurse, re, I do. Would you mind if I posted it, with credit to you, just so that I can mark this question answered? Incidentally, I saw a few Melissa Blues this year, and one literally just today! I can't remember perfectly, but this one seems about the same size and overwing colours, just different underwing, so Echo Blue seems likely—and I've almost certainly forgotten any more details than that that some future sleuth might rely on anyway. $\endgroup$
    – LSpice
    Commented Jul 22, 2023 at 19:11

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@anongoodnurse said:

Try LYCAENIDAE (gray wings belong to this family as well). There are smaller ones (called "blues") very similar to gray hairstreaks, e.g.the Echo Blue. Hard to find the distribution, though, but definitely Southern N.A.

Since this was a guess, they said that they preferred not to post it as an answer, but also that it was OK for me to do so, with attribution. To avoid reputation, I am making this answer CW.

Though I no longer have a perfect recollection of the fine details of this sighting, and only the grainy photograph to jar my memory, I believe, based on later definite sightings, that the butterfly in the pictures above is indeed an echo blue.

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