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I am surprise to find an insect caught at the end of what seems to be very long nearly invisible thread/web, most importantly where the insect is caught is actually a passage way where we enter the house so there seems to be no chance for this web to be there unless it was built in few hours!

Questions: What kind of spider could this be and could the web have been there all along or it was built instantly? Do these spiders build lots of long thread like webs in hope of capturing prey one day as I have never seen such web anywhere in my house. Will the spider roll up its prey or will eat it there? I want to know this because I am anticipating guests tonight so cant have it lingering there, unless it eats up the prey fast or takes it up to the ceiling.

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P.S. I am going to let the spider do its business to see if its going to take the insect back up or will eat it there itself.

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    $\begingroup$ For ID questions like this, you should give as many details as you can: where in the world the picture was taken, what time of day, etc. and especially about how big the subjects are. $\endgroup$
    – timeskull
    Feb 10, 2023 at 15:44
  • $\begingroup$ the picture was taken in Dubai, at around evening. I am not sure about the size because I didnt want to touch the subject. However surprisingly after 1 hour the spider and its prey was gone. $\endgroup$
    – user0193
    Feb 10, 2023 at 19:35

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The pictures don't show the eyes, but from the shape of the cephalothorax, this is a jumping spider. Large ones are about 1 cm long, so unless that moth is huge, the size range fits. Here's a user-submitted picture from spiderid.com showing Platycryptus undatus feeding in a similar way: jumping spider dangling from a silk line, holding a roach

Jumping spiders frequently attach a silk dragline to the ground before jumping. This functions as a safety line if they miss, but also allows them to change their position in midair which helps them to land on their feet even on surfaces that aren't parallel to the one they jumped off of.

So, probably the spider saw the moth resting on the wall or wherever, jumped on it and injected venom, the moth dropped from the wall and tried to escape, but the spider attached the dragline to it. Possibly the spider then retreated up the silk line to wait for the moth to die, and went down to feed once the silk line stopped moving, which is when you found it. The picture above came with a comment that the spider ate its prey in-place, so yours probably will not try to move the moth.

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  • $\begingroup$ I believe the spider was around 1cm long . But after an hour both were gone. I thought it might have fell on the ground cause if you watch the video there was wind blowing from the window, I am not sure how resililent the silk is, but I couldnt locate it in the floor. $\endgroup$
    – user0193
    Feb 10, 2023 at 19:41
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, +1. Fun to learn new things about my favorite kind of spider! $\endgroup$ Feb 10, 2023 at 20:16

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