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can you please identify this spider which was found on indoor banana plant eating(?) a fly? Located in central europe - Czech Republic, Moravia region. Photo taken in April 23rd. Banana plant is located indoor, behind the window facing southwest side. 228m above the sealine. Googled "webless spiders" but couldn't find anything similar to this one.

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Please edit your question and add some details like: when did you see this? What time of year? Can you be a bit more precise than "central Europe"? How about habitat? Was this in a house? On a mountain? $\endgroup$
    – terdon
    Apr 24, 2023 at 13:28
  • $\begingroup$ Please edit your question to begin title and sentences with a capital letter. This is the form in both English and Czech. $\endgroup$
    – David
    Apr 27, 2023 at 20:00

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This is something in the Thomisoidea family (Crab and Running Crab spider superfamily).

You can review the community-observed species of crab and running crab spiders in Czechia here: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=8264&subview=map&taxon_id=367176&view=species

The two stripes down the carapace are unlike Philodromus, where the stripes in Philodromus are at the edges of the carapace while in this photo, there is clear space between the stripes and the edges of the carapace. In North America, I would has assumed this was Mecaphesa (in the Thomisidae family), but Mecaphesa does not seem to exist in Europe.

But Europe (and Czech, in particular) has the Triangle Crab Spider (Ebrechtella tricuspidata) (this genus does not exist in North America). This Triangle Crab Spider has the same key indicators as in this given photo: short - almost dwarf-like - hind legs. Brown-striped front legs. Green abdomen. Two stripes down the carapace with remaining spacing on the outsides.

This photo was observed in Czechia:

enter image description here

The observation and identification can be found here: https://inaturalist.org/observations/61869636

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