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I have not been able to find any literature that clearly states this, but if I understand correctly, T and B cells are diploid.

If so, there are two sets of genomes, and if both are TCR/VDJ reconstituted, it would seem that one cell would have two different TCR/antibodies. In other words, there will be a TCR/antibody produced by TCR/VDJ rearrangement of a patternal chromosome and a TCR/antibody produced by TCR/VDJ rearrangement of a maternal chromosome. Why doesn't that happen?

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I searched for this question and obtained the answer, which I will expand on.

There is a mechanism called 'allele exclusion' (allelic exclusion), which means that when one of a pair of immunoglobulin/TCR genes is successfully reconstituted and becomes a functional gene, the other one ceases to function. Eventually, only one or the other is expressed.

For more information, search for "allele exclusion" or "allelic exclusion". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allelic_exclusion https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12707333/

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