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What kind of plant is this?

  1. Some leaves are compound (leaves of three). Other leaves are simple.

  2. Located in an urban garden in the shade; east of Toronto, Ontario, Canada (July 30, 2023).

  3. Woody vine crawling up a fence. Vine has feet that stick to the fence.

  4. Related posts: (30 feet away on the other side of the lawn; all are different specimens)

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Edit:

This plant/location in the garden is especially hard to photograph. It's hard to reach, dark, and surrounded by thorny brambles. And there are lots of different species of plants in the same spot; it's hard to tell what leaves are attached to what plants when viewing a photograph.

Rather than take another dark, poor-quality photo during the day, I made a video at night with a bright light. I tried to show that there are lots of differently-shaped leaves attached to the same plant. Some leaves are simple leaves. Others are compound leaves of three.

YouTube video

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  • $\begingroup$ Does this answer your question? Is this poison ivy? $\endgroup$
    – bob1
    Jul 31, 2023 at 1:42
  • $\begingroup$ leaves in 3s is your key here. Definitely poison ivy (again)... see your other question, look at the attachment of the vine to the fence and the leaf arrangement. $\endgroup$
    – bob1
    Jul 31, 2023 at 1:44

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As a novice, my guess is Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata).

Eastern Poison Ivy vs Boston Ivy

Boston Ivy: A deciduous woody vine native to east Asia, introduced in North America. Established in numerous scattered locations, mostly around urban areas. It is a close relative of the native Virginia creeper.

Middle leaflet has no stem or a short stem not much longer than that of side leaflets.

enter image description here

Plants can have both compound (trifoliate) and simple leaves. Some leaves have two side leaflets fused to create a two-leaflet leaf.

enter image description here

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