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According to my information,When transpiration increases, The amount of water lost from the plant's leaves increases.So,Shall i assume That the relation is inverse according to this condition,or shall i put in consideration that when transpiration increases , The amount of absorbed water increases to compensate the lost water so the relation is direct?

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  • $\begingroup$ What do you think - what would be the result if water uptake did not compensate for water loss? $\endgroup$
    – bob1
    Aug 14, 2023 at 1:36
  • $\begingroup$ @bob1. I Think that no physiological support occurs. $\endgroup$ Aug 14, 2023 at 23:05
  • $\begingroup$ Why do you think that? What would be the consequence for a leaf if it lost water and didn't replace it? A hint - what happens to a cut flower if you don't put it in water? $\endgroup$
    – bob1
    Aug 15, 2023 at 1:23

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When transpiration increases, the rate at which water evaporates from the plant's leaves also increases. This creates a negative pressure (tension) in the xylem, which helps to pull water up from the roots to replace the lost water. So, in this case, there is a direct relationship between transpiration and water absorption, as increased transpiration can lead to increased water uptake from the soil to maintain the water balance within the plant. However, an excessive transpiration, such as during hot and dry conditions, can lead to water stress on the plant. If the rate of transpiration becomes too high and the water uptake from the soil doesn't compensate for the water loss, it can lead to wilting or even damage. So, in this case the relationship could be considered somewhat indirect, as high transpiration could potentially lead to reduced water availability and stress on the plant.

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