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What species of bird is this?

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    $\begingroup$ +1 for precise location. Sometimes questions here include vague locations (e.g. Canada) or no location at all, nor even a hint on the habitat, and location is often useful to discard a lot of species. $\endgroup$
    – Pere
    Sep 13, 2023 at 11:53
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    $\begingroup$ The second picture is very good (both for identification and the moment) $\endgroup$
    – justhalf
    Sep 15, 2023 at 5:14

2 Answers 2

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I'm highly confident that this is a cormorant. I'm less certain of the species, but based on the location I would bet that it is a double-crested cormorant (perhaps a juvenile based on the head color/feathering, though I don't know if this varies in adults based on season) as these are found in high numbers around the Great Lakes region, including Lake Ontario.

Double-crested cormorant juvenile photo by Jane Mann, from Macaulay Library

See also:

The rise of the Double-crested Cormorant on the Great Lakes: WINNING THE WAR AGAINST CONTAMINANTS

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    $\begingroup$ Looking at the maps in my Sibley guide, there are occasionally vagrant Great Cormorants & Anhingas in the Great Lakes area. But their coloration is different, even for the juveniles, and so I agree that it's far, far more likely to be a Double-Crested Cormorant $\endgroup$ Sep 15, 2023 at 1:55
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    $\begingroup$ Anhinga can be ruled out by the bill; theirs is straight, without the hook at the end cormorants have. $\endgroup$
    – timeskull
    Sep 15, 2023 at 15:05
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A cormorant or possibly a shag. Far more common in saltwater surroundings, but can be at home in fresh water.

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